HP laserjet model names (233 Views)
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Super Advisor
ian_49
Posts: 287
Registered: ‎01-21-2003
Message 1 of 9 (233 Views)
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HP laserjet model names

Not being well informed about laserjet printers, I am confused by the plethora of models available. In partular please, I would like to find out what the suffixes numbers and letters mean (especially the letters)
What does the "N" signfy on a laserjet 5N .....ie in what way does the "N" model on a printer differ from one that doesnt have the "N" suffix.

Other suffixes are "L", "PLUS", "P", "M",
"si" (as in 4si) ;
also "V" as in 4 V.

Also, generally speaking, what is the difference between the "4" series, the "5" series, "6" series and others such as the "1000" series etc
Thanks Ian
Im not an expert
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Respected Contributor
Kyle Grimm_1
Posts: 217
Registered: ‎12-09-2002
Message 2 of 9 (233 Views)

Re: HP laserjet model names

N stands for Network, M usaully stands for Macintosh, D stands for duplexer, T means you get an extra paper tray when you purchase it. Hope this helps.
Anyone need an employee?
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Honored Contributor
CA835871
Posts: 1,683
Registered: ‎03-18-2002
Message 3 of 9 (233 Views)

Re: HP laserjet model names

The ???N??? means it???s a network printer. The non ???N??? printers do not come with a JetDirect card. The ???P??? typically means postscript. ???M??? usually means it is for the Macintosh platform. You are also putting more into the rest of the nomenclatures then is really needed. The ???si??? is just their larger printer platform for high volume. The ???Plus??? means nothing, it is used for marketing.

The difference between the majority the printers is just a newer model. When the 5 came out, the 4 was no longer sold. Recently they have gone to using hundreds rather then single numbers. Now the numbers mean nothing, just a different laser jet printer. The 1000 is a host-based printer while most of the others are not. Host based printers cannot be networked directly; they are also set for much lower volumes. The laser jet is a family of printers, with many different models. Consider it almost like a car line, they all share some likeness but are different in their price and function.
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Super Advisor
ian_49
Posts: 287
Registered: ‎01-21-2003
Message 4 of 9 (233 Views)

Re: HP laserjet model names

Thank you for these replies.
I see that "M" means it is for a macintosh, but can one with an "M" suffix also still be used on a PC.

Also, for what purpose would one choose one with the "P" or "postscript suffix- how can having postscript help?
Please, what does the "V" suffix signify?
Thanks
Ian
Im not an expert
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Advisor
CA916045
Posts: 22
Registered: ‎02-05-2003
Message 5 of 9 (233 Views)

Re: HP laserjet model names

Ian,

M series printers are usable on both Mac and PC formats. PC formats often need them to work on a language level rather than PCL. (PCL-3, PCL-5 Pcl-6 and so on) Printer Command Language.

Macs are run on postscript levels. More often than not the only visible difference is the way IMAGAES and FONTS are used and the availability of The two. Postscript is a far more FONT intensive language and has many more appealling and creative fonts.

More over, many file types and such for example PDF's utilize this postscipt language in their applications requiering many users who often need such graphically intesive images and words to display properly to have postscipt availability.

See also:

Start Menu

Settings

Printers

Right mouse click on one and select

Properties:

Fonts: Substitions take place to handle them in the pc's format of postscript know as TrueType fonts. however many find they still just don't look the same.
Doing the RIGHT thing can only be judged by what you do when no one is looking
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Super Advisor
ian_49
Posts: 287
Registered: ‎01-21-2003
Message 6 of 9 (233 Views)

Re: HP laserjet model names

I heard that the "Plus" means that the speed is 12 ppm rather than 8 ppm ( eg Hp laserjet 4 = 8 ppm; HP laserjet 4 plus = 12 ppm.
The one with a "P" suffix on the model doesnt seem to have postscript facility tho. I wondered if anyone knows what the "P" means , and for that matter the "L" on some - i heard it means the budget or low cost range of models - could this be true?
Im not an expert
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Occasional Advisor
Christine Gillett
Posts: 12
Registered: ‎08-23-2002
Message 7 of 9 (233 Views)

Re: HP laserjet model names

I have a HP 4L Laserjet. The L meant it was smaller, etc. for home use. I got it in the early 90s and it still works great. But it wasn't cheap, at the time it was $700!
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Occasional Visitor
VanB
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎04-07-2003
Message 8 of 9 (233 Views)

Re: HP laserjet model names

The HP naming convention is quite clear...

There are only some (older) printers which are not named this way, for instance the 5Si

In the naming convention the suffixes are as follows:
N: Network printer (JetDirect)
T: Extra papertray
D: Duplexing Unit installed
S: Stapler
L: Stacker (S was already in use)
"We try to make our products more idiot-proof, while the world out there is attempting to make better idiots..."
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Advisor
CA947803
Posts: 14
Registered: ‎04-05-2003
Message 9 of 9 (233 Views)

Re: HP laserjet model names

There is also one bit of confusing designations that HP uses. That is "Ce" and "Se". The "Ce" models are for commercial/business customers and are sold by resellers. The "Se" models are consumer grade models and sold through retail stores. What is also confusing is that although they are exactly the same printers, they may come with different warranties and especially different software bundles. What was also very confusing was HP's decision to sell a Lasejet(2200) and a Designjet(2200) at the same time. Just got a message today from HP, the new 100 and 120 Designjets are on the market. The 1300(20ppm) just replaced the 1200(15ppm) and so it continues.
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