Re: Installing TRIM kills Word & Excel 2007 (756 Views)
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Advisor
Jason Bywater
Posts: 17
Registered: ‎12-08-2010
Message 1 of 7 (756 Views)

Installing TRIM kills Word & Excel 2007

A rather annoying problem with Office 2007 & TRIM. We have WinXP PC’s with Office 2007 then we install TRIM client (6.2.5 build 1300), TRIM works fine however Word & Excel can’t be launched, (PowerPoint etc are working okay). Once this has happened we can’t get Word or Excel 2007 to work again, uninstalling TRIM, repairing Office or uninstalling and reinstalling Office to no avail.

 

When trying to start Word we get the following error message:

winword.exe – This app has failed to start because the app config is incorrect. Reinstalling the app may fix this problem”. The Excel error msg is the same.

 

Strangely if TRIM was installed first then Office 2007 both seem to work okay. Our current workaround is to reinstall an older version of Office, usually 2003 or to reimage the PC and start afresh.

Jason
Honored Contributor
Grundy
Posts: 2,845
Registered: ‎02-16-2009
Message 2 of 7 (756 Views)

Re: Installing TRIM kills Word & Excel 2007

 


Jasonbywater wrote:

A rather annoying problem with Office 2007 & TRIM. We have WinXP PC’s with Office 2007 then we install TRIM client (6.2.5 build 1300),


 

TRIM 6.2.5 build 1300 had some major issues in it and was recalled very shortly after being released.

You should NOT be using this build and I suggest you uninstall it asap and get your hands on build 1322.

 

 

*NOTE*

'Recall' is a term I am using to describe that the build was removed from the SSO website. It is not a HP statement that the product was 'recalled' in a legal sense.

 

 



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Kapish.com.au
Advisor
Jason Bywater
Posts: 17
Registered: ‎12-08-2010
Message 3 of 7 (756 Views)

Re: Installing TRIM kills Word & Excel 2007

Yes 1300 is hair pulling out buggy and I've been working on the 1322 upgrade since I started this job late last year, unfortunately the damage is done and the 1322 upgrade final approval is at least a month away. Oh where is that rubber stamp, mmmm or straitjacket.

Jason
Honored Contributor
Grundy
Posts: 2,845
Registered: ‎02-16-2009
Message 4 of 7 (756 Views)

Re: Installing TRIM kills Word & Excel 2007

The build was recalled, there shouldn't be any approval process, it should just be replaced instantly...

 

*NOTE*

'Recall' is a term I am using to describe that the build was removed from the SSO website. It is not a HP statement that the product was 'recalled' in a legal sense.



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NOT A HP EMPLOYEE
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Kapish.com.au
Advisor
Jason Bywater
Posts: 17
Registered: ‎12-08-2010
Message 5 of 7 (756 Views)

Re: Installing TRIM kills Word & Excel 2007

Alas it's not that simple, we have to prove that 1322 doesn't impact badly on business critical systems, thankfully most of the PC's getting TRIM don't have sensitive medical apps so it only takes months of testing. I understand that my predecessor rushed out 1300 to fix problems only to cause new problems, such is life, through my 'slow' approach I've found new problems with 1322 but no show stoppers yet.

 

Regards, The Snail

Jason
Super Advisor
samd_1
Posts: 297
Registered: ‎02-07-2001
Message 6 of 7 (756 Views)

Re: Installing TRIM kills Word & Excel 2007

Grundy,

 

Is the term "recall" appropriate? Was it officially recalled by HP? Where is the announcement I can find to present to our client? 

 

The term recall to me means the manufacturer is going to pay to replace a fault in their product. Like a car manufacturer. Is HP therefore going to pay back our client and us for releasing what I'm interpretting from this post to be an admitted faulty product? We're not talking chump change here. Why should our client pay to replace this if they are affected (not sure they are affected as they only use the Outlook Integration but who knows if they might enable ODMA in the future) by a product you say should be removed "instantly"?  I mean the term "instantly" means it's a ticking time bomb or something. You work for HP correct and I know you say your comments are personal but.....

 

It's about time software companies do more testing or be prepared to reimburse their clients for the money their client's spent rolling out their products. Expensive ones like Trim especially. Client/Server technology sucks for this very reason. At least if there was no fat client there would only be a server to update.

 

We upgraded to 6.2.5 build 1300 because 6.2.4 build 1240 had nonstop crashes with the Outlook Integration. So we and our client spent time and money to rollout 6.2.5 build 1300. Seems to have fixed the Outlook problem. But now I come onto this forum and read I should tell my client to remove this build "instantly"?  HP or whomever represents them in a forum should have a better answer than rolling out an entire build.  I'm tired of the nonstop poor QA, at least it seems that way, with Trim builds. I realize it's a complex product but in my short time with the product it just seems to be poorly tested. Am I going to find in a few months a post saying build 1322 sucks for some reason? (see below about Trim 7)

 

When reading about Trim 7 and Sharepoint Integration I see where people say no go to 7.02 as Trim 7 had problems. (see what I mean about the next release?) Why the heck was it released then??? Lemme guess...The sales guys I assume. I'll stop my rant.

Honored Contributor
Grundy
Posts: 2,845
Registered: ‎02-16-2009
Message 7 of 7 (756 Views)

Re: Installing TRIM kills Word & Excel 2007

 

Is the term "recall" appropriate? Was it officially recalled by HP? Where is the announcement I can find topresent to our client?  

 

The build was pulled from the SSO website so that it was no longer available and a problem notification should have been sent out so that all HP staff were aware of the issues and could advise their customers of the problem.

Unfortunately I was in Europe for 3 months and the 1300 release fell right in the middle of that, so I am not aware of exactly what was done to inform customers or what action was taken otherwise.

 

 

The term recall to me means the manufacturer is going to pay to replace a fault in their product. Like a car manufacturer. Is HP therefore going to pay back our client and us for releasing what I'm interpretting from this post to be an admitted faulty product? We're not talking chump change here. Why should our client pay to replace this if they are affected (not sure they are affected as they only use the Outlook Integration but who knows if they might enable ODMA in the future) by a product you say should be removed "instantly"?  I mean the term "instantly" means it's a ticking time bomb or something. You work for HP correct and I know you say your comments are personal but.....

 

I am not involved in any way with money/sales/contracts at HP, you would have to discuss the above with your account manager. 'Recall' is a term I'm using because we removed the build from the SSO website. It is not an official HP position or statement, just the term I am using to stress what action was taken when the issues were found with this release.

In reality, the build was just 'pulled' from SSO so that it was no longer publicly available. In the world of software, bugs are inevitable and I don't think the true legal sense of a product 'recall' is practical for software or even if it does come under consumer 'recall' laws in Australia? The 'product' doesn't have a physical existence that can be returned to the manufacturer and a replacement version was available when 1300 was removed from SSO.

As I said though, you should discuss this with the HP account managers.

 


It's about time software companies do more testing or be prepared to reimburse their clients for the money their client's spent rolling out their products. Expensive ones like Trim especially. Client/Server technology sucks for this very reason. At least if there was no fat client there would only be a server to update.

 

Believe me, I agree on all these points! Working in support exposes us to all this on a daily basis. :smileyhappy:

 

 

We upgraded to 6.2.5 build 1300 because 6.2.4 build 1240 had nonstop crashes with the Outlook Integration. So we and our client spent time and money to rollout 6.2.5 build 1300. Seems to have fixed the Outlook problem. But now I come onto this forum and read I should tell my client to remove this build "instantly"?  HP or whomever represents them in a forum better sh!t up a better answer than that.  I'm tired of the nonstop poor QA with Trim builds. Am I going to find in a few months a post saying build 1322 sucks for some reason? (see below about Trim 7)

 

I'll rephrase:

6.2.5 build 1300 has some bugs which can cause major disruption to the user experience of the product. If you wish to continue using this build, you can, but please be aware that these problems do not have a workaround and the only option to solve this is to upgrade to a new build of 6.2.5.

 

 

When reading about Trim 7 and Sharepoint Integration I see where people say no go to 7.02 as Trim 7 had problems. (see what I mean about the next release?) Why the heck was it released then??? Lemme guess...The sales guys.  Release a good product and not one that is flawed because of sales reasons. Have a real QA process. QA properly so as to avoid this crap.

 

Again, I agree absolutely with these sentiments. Like any product from any company, Sales/Marketing determine the release dates. (There are some exceptions out there that I can think of that produce brilliant products and release software 'when it's ready', something I have pointed out internally)

I think it would definitely help if these concerns were raised with your HP account managers so that they are aware of the impact the current release schedules are having on the product. (I have personally said the same myself internally, but customer weight has much more influence)

 



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NOT A HP EMPLOYEE
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Kapish.com.au
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