Data Collection and Threshold...percentage or whole number? (117 Views)
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Occasional Contributor
Tammy Bartholomew
Posts: 7
Registered: ‎10-21-2002
Message 1 of 4 (117 Views)

Data Collection and Threshold...percentage or whole number?

Is a fixed threshold based on a percentage or a whole number?
Honored Contributor
Laurie Gellatly
Posts: 3,554
Registered: ‎10-05-1999
Message 2 of 4 (117 Views)

Re: Data Collection and Threshold...percentage or whole number?

Tammy,
Thresholds are either an absolute value
(e.g. maximum temperature) or a percentage
(e.g. > 70% line utilisation).
You can further refine the sensitivity of these
thresholds as well to prevent false alarms
or repeated alarms that are really the same
event.
Hope that answers your question.

...Laurie :{)
If you're not using OverTime, you're doing overtime!
Occasional Contributor
Tammy Bartholomew
Posts: 7
Registered: ‎10-21-2002
Message 3 of 4 (117 Views)

Re: Data Collection and Threshold...percentage or whole number?

Hi Laurie,
So what your saying is depending on what the collection is will define the value of the threshold?
Tammy
Honored Contributor
Laurie Gellatly
Posts: 3,554
Registered: ‎10-05-1999
Message 4 of 4 (117 Views)

Re: Data Collection and Threshold...percentage or whole number?

Tammy,
The definition of Threshold from the on-line
help:
Threshold
(Read-write field)
This field becomes a read-write field when
you select a collection mode that checks
thresholds.

Use this field when you want to be notified of
traffic patterns that are outside the normal
expectations. When the threshold value is
passed, the specified threshold event is
generated, and displayed in the Alarm
Browser.

To specify a threshold, select an operator
from the threshold list, enter a threshold
value, and indicate the number of
consecutive samples you want taken before
the data collector issues a threshold event.
For example, if you specify two consecutive
samples, the data collector sends a
threshold event when the threshold condition
occurs twice.

If the MIB variable being collected is a
Counter, the value in this field represents a
rate of change in units/second.

If you need to have different thresholds for
different instances, create a MIB expression
for each different instance, and configure
those expressions individually.
Also:
Rearm
(Read-write field)
This field becomes a read-write field when
you select a collection mode that checks
thresholds.

Controls the frequency of threshold events
generated. To avoid continuously generating
events, specify an appropriate rearm value.
When a MIB value drops below or is equal
to the rearm value, a rearm event is
generated. Another threshold event will not
be generated until the rearm event occurs
and the collected value again exceeds the
threshold value after being rearmed.

To specify a rearm value:

1. Specify the rearm value as a
percentage of the threshold value or
as an absolute number. Specifying the
value as a percentage is useful,
because if you change the threshold
value, the rearm value will change
proportionally. Use the buttons to the
right of the Rearm field to do so.

2. Type in the rearm value in the read-
write field.

If you specified Percent, enter a
whole or fractional number from 0 to
100.

If you specified Absolute, enter a
whole or fractional number number.
See the following example.


Example
Suppose you want to monitor CPU load
averages on a system running the HP
OpenView SNMP Agent software. You can
set a threshold of 200 and a rearm value of
150 (absolute). When the Data Collector
detects a value above 200, a threshold
event is generated. Another threshold event
will be generated only if the reading drops
below 150 (sending a rearm event) and then
goes above 200 again. Note that you can
also do this by entering the rearm value as
75 percent of the threshold value.

So, the thresholds are absolute values (even if
the collection is a actually a percentage)
while the re-arm can either be another
absolute value OR a % of the threshold value.
Hope this makes it clear.

Cheers ...Laurie :{)
If you're not using OverTime, you're doing overtime!
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