M2727nf Formatter Boards (14315 Views)
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Occasional Visitor
Neil Meinhart
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎12-09-2008
Message 1 of 22 (14,315 Views)

M2727nf Formatter Boards

Hi

My company owns around 30 of the hp m2727 printers, and I had a couple questions to anyone with time to listen...

 

After we began implementing our printers in the office area this seemed ok, then after a while, a couple ended up having bad formatting boards, and were replaced under warranty... As more time went on, more of the printers ended up getting replaced...all in all probably 8 to 10 of them...this went on until the units no longer had warranty...then for the next year or so I replaced the boards with ones we purchased online for about $120 each...this didn't seem too bad because I had bought 5 at a time, and quite a bit of time had passed since I looked at what was happening to the prices of the replacement boards....As I look this week, a person would be pretty hard pressed to find a board for less than $300....Personally It seems to me that HP should be doing something about these crapppy boards that never should have been used in the first place....At least sell them to users at cost, or at a reasonable amount...

So here we are with our 30 or so printers, right now I have about 4 of them needing boards, and can't decide if its worth spending the bucks on the boards, or say the heck with in and find another brand that has decent product...

 

any thoughts???

 

regards

Neil

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Outstanding Contributor
DavidZuts
Posts: 15,155
Registered: ‎02-27-2006
Message 2 of 22 (14,300 Views)

Re: M2727nf Formatter Boards

Actually if you had contacted HP they issued a service note for the formatter board for t his unit quite some time ago.  Service notes will repair the unit free of charge even if the unit is out of warranty.  You have to bring the unit to an authorized support provider for repair.  If you do have the provider refer to document c01940233.  If you do not want to be troubled with bringing the unit to a support provider you can use the "baking" method to repair the boards yourself.  You just remove the board and remove any tape or extra memory chips.  Place the board face up in a baking pan propped up so the bottom of the board does not touch the pan.  Prehead a good oven to 350F (177C) and when the oven is ready put the pan with the card in the oven.  Leave in the oven for 8 minutes, remove and let cool for 20 minutes.  Put back in the printer and power on and odds are the board will be fine.  Problem is cold solder joints on the main processor and baking reflows the solder.

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HTT_Steve
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎06-08-2011
Message 3 of 22 (13,605 Views)

Re: M2727nf Formatter Boards

This is going to sound stupid but it worked great for is.

HP Support said I needed to call Marimon in Houston to get the formatter board replaced. Marimon said the board would be around $250 and the tech time to replace it would be another $250 or more because the board was so hard to get to. What a joke.

I downloaded a copy of the service manual and it takes a whole 5 minutes to get it out. It's behind the left side cover. What a bunch of thieves.

I Googled around and found another thread about the formatter problems with this particular HP M2727nf printer and followed the instructions.

They said that the problems were because of poor manufacturing of the formatter boards and the solder joints weren't properly fused. The poster said that you should take the board out (six phillips screws and a few cables and connectors (VERY EASY)) and put the formatter board bottom side up on a baking sheet and put in an oven at 350 degrees for 8 minutes. This will allow the solder to reseat.

Voila! No problems since. It works like a charm. Just make sure that you have a digital thermometer to verify that your oven is 350. Some run a little hotter and I just wanted to double check. It was cheap insurance that I didn't overheat the board. Let it cool for 20 minutes on the baking sheet before you touch it or try to move it at all. It will smell a little while cooking but that is the solder reliquifying and it's what you want. DO NOT OVERCOOK IT!

Saved me about $600.

FYI, the printer symptoms were that it was turning itself off and back on for no reason and getting stuck on the initializing screen after doing so. I would have to turn the printer power off and back on to get it to work and it would only do it again after a few minutes or an hour or so.

Good Luck!
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Anthony_Paul
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎01-17-2012
Message 4 of 22 (12,513 Views)

Re: M2727nf Formatter Boards

I know that this is an old post, but the information proved invaluable to me today (January 17, 2012).

HP is no longer honoring the service advisory on these faulty formatter boards so, without some radical 'outside the box' fix, my printer would be a glorified paper weight.

 

So, I removed the board and baked it at 350 degrees for exactly 8 minutes, as instructed (on a previous thread).

I waited 20 minutes plus for the board to cool off and reinstalled it.

Long story short, the printer works as good as new!

A radical but effective fix.

 

Questions to anyone who has successfully performed this:

What should my expectations be in terms of longevity?

Can the board be re-baked in the event that this fix proves to be temporary?

Thanks in advance for any responses.

 

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BuzzBodhi
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎02-09-2012
Message 5 of 22 (12,322 Views)

Re: M2727nf Formatter Boards

HP has made its printers popular the same way that Budweiser and Microsoft have made their products popular - through marketing. Quality is far from first place in the scheme of things for HP products.

Of all the things for HP industrial engineers to screw up, soldering circuit cards has to be the dumbest of them all.

 

Sure, heating the circuit card in your oven can "fix" fractured solder connections temporarily, but unless the solder connection is properly reflowed it is still a fractured solder connection. This leaves it vunerable to temperature changes and vibration. The "fix" might work for as long as you use the printer. It might last a week. Who knows how long it will work? Certainly not HP. If HP knew what they were doing when they built the silly thing, solder connections wouldn't be failure mode.

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Outstanding Contributor
DavidZuts
Posts: 15,155
Registered: ‎02-27-2006
Message 6 of 22 (12,310 Views)

Re: M2727nf Formatter Boards

What a bunch of bull crap. We have repaired these boards and 100's of jet direct cards with this method and maybe 1% of them go bad at a future date. The method works because the solder joints are cold solder joints that sometimes have contact and other times do not and the baking re-flows the solder and corrects the problem. How do you think these boards are made in the first place. They use heat to melt pre-applied solder.
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jeannets29
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎04-10-2012
Message 7 of 22 (11,928 Views)

Re: M2727nf Formatter Boards

Hello From France,

 

I have also repaired this card with this method... And surprise, it works perfectly now

 

That printer was stocked in a container for two years; because a new secretary baby time... When she comme back at work, that printer was only OFF status..  Nothing appear about that in French forums.

 

Thanks my God to find this way and your technical oven expertise and thanks to you, my network printer print again.

 

Voila... +++

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Occasional Collector
Maguirrepaz
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎04-21-2012
Message 8 of 22 (11,818 Views)

Re: M2727nf Formatter Boards

[ Edited ]

Thank God I read this posts! Guys I'm so happy and so impressed of what it just happened: my M2727 had been dead for almost 8 months, I sent it to a technical service and they wanted usd 540.- to replace the famous Fomatter Board, then I read here the "baking technique for resurrection" and I did it in my kitchen with an standard electric oven, with the remarkable and amazing possitive result. Now, my M2727 is up and running again! Thanks everyone for this valuable information and for giving the chance to feel that I saved usd 540!

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Honored Contributor
Kevin_Adams
Posts: 2,316
Registered: ‎07-05-2004
Message 9 of 22 (11,809 Views)

Re: M2727nf Formatter Boards

BuzzBodhi do you understand how these boards are made? odds are a human hand will not touch them and soldering will be with solder paste due to surface mount components.
At best it might use wave soldering for the large components then baking for the paste components but human contact is most likely non existent.
 
Dry joints have been around for as long as solder existed, i've spent most of my career correcting dry joints at some point and in fact the first thing you learnt in electronics class was how to make a good joint.
 
Regardless of making the joint with a soldering iron or baking if you can get a good reflow then there's no reason it won't last as long as expected. Dry joints tend to be either the joint flexing with heat/cold, unclean components or circuit board, lack of flux (to clean the join), poor quality solder or lack of heat.
Whilst you may argue you are not applying flux or removing the original solder, lead free solder seems to reflow much better than traditional leaded solder without the need for reflux.
 
At the end of the day HP are no different to any other company a product will be made at a price, if humans soldered the boards the price would be prohibitive and most people would probably not purchase.
 
 Our own workshops agree with Davids advice 100%, we don't bake boards here but many of our engineers have done so privately and with a very high success rate, in fact if it doesn't work the opinion is that your oven temperature guage is wrong.
 
This chap is saving you guys hundreds of dollars and pounds and as someone commented, it's not hard to get these parts out - often no more than 5 minutes.
If it ain't simple it ain't worth doing.
(Don't forget Kudos if people have helped)
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Occasional Advisor
HabsterL
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎04-04-2008
Message 10 of 22 (10,889 Views)

Re: M2727nf Formatter Boards

Does anyone have a PDF Service Manual for the M2727nf ?   .... or step by step photos of how to disassemble and remove the Formatter board?   Thanks in advance.

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Occasional Advisor
HabsterL
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎04-04-2008
Message 11 of 22 (10,886 Views)

Re: M2727nf Formatter Boards

I've found the manual on one of DavidZuts' other posts. Thanks for sharing this information.
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Occasional Collector
ROGER NOIA
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎07-29-2008
Message 12 of 22 (10,406 Views)

Re: M2727nf Formatter Boards

So after reading it here, I removed the formatter and baked it, however something that looks like a battery has apparently broken open and a black powdery substance is visible.  Is it safe to still use the formatter/printer if I put the board back in?

 

Thanks,

 

Roger

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Outstanding Contributor
DavidZuts
Posts: 15,155
Registered: ‎02-27-2006
Message 13 of 22 (10,400 Views)

Re: M2727nf Formatter Boards

Your oven was not set correctly. You have to bake the board at 350F (177C). If to hot the battery may go bad. You can still use the board, however, if the battery is indeed blown you will lose date and time and some other settings each time the power is turned off and will have to put them back in.
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atsik
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎10-17-2012
Message 14 of 22 (10,344 Views)

Re: M2727nf Formatter Boards

actually it's easy, but if you need step by step, read this.

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Occasional Advisor
HabsterL
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎04-04-2008
Message 15 of 22 (10,282 Views)

Re: M2727nf Formatter Boards

Would like to add myself to the SUCCESSFUL repair of HP M2727nf formatter board club ...  I used a TAYLOR 1470 Digital Thermometer from Wal-Mart to monitor the oven temperature.  I manually increased heat if the temperature dropped to 345F, and opened the door (to release heat) if it went to 355F.  Maintained as close to 350F as possible for 8 minutes.  Then cooled for minimum 20 minutes (I let mine go 30 minutes).

 

THANK YOU everyone for sharing this tip !!!

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HabsterL
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎04-04-2008
Message 16 of 22 (10,281 Views)

Re: M2727nf Formatter Boards

I have another formatter board with a damaged C550 (capacitor)  ...  This is located just below the top left screw.  The original owner of the M2727nf damaged the C550 when trying to remove a stripped screw.

 

Does anyone know what C550 does .... and if it would be harardous to continue using this board ?

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billpcary
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎11-02-2013
Message 17 of 22 (6,406 Views)

Re: M2727nf Formatter Boards

Well I was skeptical at first after reading about the re-heating (solder reflow) procedure. But, being an electrical engineer, it makes sense. However after reading some od the other posts (excellent info by the way), I decided to take a few extra precautions. It will help if you have soldering experience and equipment...
- I removed (unsoldered) the lithium battery. Turned out it was down to ~2.7v, which is on the low side, even for a
3v lithium battery. I didn't have another battery hand of the same size, so I soldered leads on a larger CR2016
lithium battery and used it after the reflow
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billpcary
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎11-02-2013
Message 18 of 22 (6,404 Views)

Re: M2727nf Formatter Boards

***RE-POST***
Well I was skeptical at first after reading about the re-heating (solder reflow) procedure. But, being an electrical engineer, it makes sense. However after reading some of the other posts (excellent info by the way), I decided to
take a few extra precautions. It will help if you have soldering experience and equipment... If you decide to
remove the battery like I did before the re-heating process, if your printer boots all the way to the working state
(mine booted up, but died with completely blank display and no lit LEDs after a few hours), I'd recommend going
through all the setup menus and write down your customized settings that you programmed in. If your particular
printer doesn't finish the boot up, then you won't be able to read your customized settings, and you will have to
re-program them if the re-heat procedure is successful.

****PROCEDURE****
- First, UNPLUG THE AC CORD FROM THE PRINTER!!!
-Remove the toner cartridge & paper tray.
- Remove the left side cover by inserting two screwdrivers along the vertical mounting seam of the cover on the
BACK of the printer and prying along the vertical seam until the cover pops off. There is a good video of this
removal on U-Tube. The title of the video is "Printer problem M1522nf", which is not the same exact printer
as the M2727, but the printer construction, and the same formatter board defect are virtually the same
-Touch both hands to the large metal chassis that now you see to discharge any ESD from your hands relative to the
printer chassis
- Remove all of the cables from the LARGE (formatter) board with the Ethernet and USB connectors pointing out the
back of the printer
- Remove the six screws that hold the board down and remove the formatter board, holding it by the edges as
much as possible
- I removed (unsoldered) the lithium battery. Turned out it was down to ~2.7v, which is on the low side, even for a
3v lithium battery. I didn't have another battery handy of the same size, so I soldered leads onto a larger CR2016
lithium battery and re-soldered it on after the reflow (upcoming oven bake). You may get lucky and not damage
your battery, but I didn't feel comfortable heating the battery for 8 minutes at 350 degF
- I removed the insulating plastic in the memory module area, and the sticky goop residue under it with solder flux
cleaner. You could probably use acetone instead
- I looked at the board all over on both sides under an ~30x binocular microscope. No obvious cold solder joints, but
I saw MANY solder joints that were shiny (correct) on the lower part part of the joint near the board, but were
crystalline (potentially bad) on the tops of the joints. It definitely helped to have the binocular microscope here as
I was able to adjust the focal plane up and down suspicious solder joints. I didn't see any screaming bad joints, but
then again I could not see under one of the large ICs that had BGA (ball grid array) solder connections that were
under the part
- I next fabricated four 1" "standoffs" that were ~1" high/each and inserted each into the four outermost mounting
holes. Aluminum foil is a good choice here since it is so "formable," and does not degrade at these temperatures.
It's VERY important for the board to not even be close to touching anything on the bottom solder joints as we
want the hot air in the oven to be able to come in contact with the bottom solder joints. Form each "standoff
somewhat like a golf tee - wide on the bottom, medium size shaft (~0.3" works well), and then compress/roll
the aluminum foil on the end down to ~0.1" so it will fit into the board mounting holes. After forming/mounting
the standoffs on a metal sheet (I used a cookie sheet), look at the assembly on each side, and ensure the
aluminum foil near the bottom of the board is not touching anything outside of mounting pad around each
mounting hole used.
- Next, insert the assembly into a 350 degF oven for 8 minutes
- After the 8 minutes was up, I removed the assembly from the oven and let it cool for an hour, but at 20 minutes,
it was pretty much near room temperature
- I re-mounted the new battery on the board, carefully inserting the battery positive lead(with the "+") into the
battery hole on the board that also is marked with a "+", & then installed the insulator material previously
removed from the memory module area (still plenty of sticky left)
- I re-mounted the board in the printer, installing all of the "hard to insert" connections before putting any
mounting screws in. If the board is lying flat in front of you with the Ethernet and USB connectors furtherest away
from you, these connectors would be on the closest (to you) half of the left and right sides.
- Carefully align the board on the metal mounting tabs sticking up, and after inserting all 6 screws, install the
remaining cables to the remaining corresponding board connectors
- Reinstaller the toner cartridge, the paper tray, and AC line cord
- Flip the power switch on, praying all during the boot-up
- if boot-up was successful, you might want to leave it on for it least 24 hours before re-installing the left side plastic
cover. Be sure to hook in the front vertical seem of the cover first, and then align the top edge while pressing down
Progressively toward the rear of the printer. As the rear side of the cover is going on, make sure that the Ethernet
and USB connectors are aligned with their holes.
- If it doesn't boot up correctly, it might be worthwhile to repeat the re-flow procedure again before giving up on your
particular formatter board
GOOD LUCK!
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billpcary
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎11-02-2013
Message 19 of 22 (6,395 Views)

Re: M2727nf Formatter Boards

I forgot to add that my re-heat procedure was SUCCESSFUL! Much better than the alternatives, especially since I was not even able to find a new model equivalent replacement "all in one laser" printer /copier with duplex copy capability. The CR2016 lithium battery is available almost universally everywhere (Walmart, grocery stores, drug stores, etc) since it is used in many of the "keychain" LED lights. You might even be lfind the original BR1225 (with some available that would have the necessary mounting leads attached) at a Radio Shack or on Ebay or Amazon. I found one Panasonic model with leads from the seller "Materro" for $8., so check the above sources for a model with PC board mounting leads attached (most on Amazon came without leads).
If you're careful (and have good luck), you can save yourself HUNDREDS of $$ and lots of aggrevation with this re-heat procedure! GO FOR IT!!!

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ivangardos
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎11-25-2012
Message 20 of 22 (3,744 Views)

Re: M2727nf Formatter Boards

Me too 16 out of 20 printers. Only solution with HP is a class action suit.
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ivangardos
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎11-25-2012
Message 21 of 22 (2,125 Views)

Re: M2727nf Formatter Boards

I'm with you on that one. How de we start. There must be thousands of us in the same angry pickle!

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DonPhilbin
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎02-11-2014
Message 22 of 22 (1,794 Views)

Re: M2727nf Formatter Boards

Has anyone received a satisfactory response from HP to "baking" a defective formatter board? This looks like a trend.

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