Re: largefiles vs nolargefiles (302 Views)
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Valued Contributor
sen_ux
Posts: 166
Registered: ‎10-01-2008
Message 1 of 11 (302 Views)
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largefiles vs nolargefiles

What is the internal difference between largefiles and nolargefiles. Why is it nolargefiles by default.?
Is there any problem in keeping largefiles while creating a filesystem.?Why there is an option.?

Thanks
Exalted Contributor
Steven E. Protter
Posts: 33,806
Registered: ‎08-15-2002
Message 2 of 11 (302 Views)

Re: largefiles vs nolargefiles

Shalom,

nolargefiles means no file can be bigger than 2 GB.

This is a pretty low limit so with few exceptions, I include this option when I use newfs to make new file systems.

What happens with nolargefiles if an application tries to create or append a file to a size larger than 2 GB is an error.

SEP
Steven E Protter
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Honored Contributor
Fabio Ettore
Posts: 1,738
Registered: ‎11-19-2003
Message 3 of 11 (302 Views)

Re: largefiles vs nolargefiles

Hi,

the difference between nolargefiles and largefiles was already mentioned.
About your question, "why is it nolargefiles by default", I believe it was just a choice, there was no specific problem (this is my thought, but if someone has different information I'd be glad to know).

However I think it also depends on the version of vxfs is on the system. Read the following about VxFS 4.1:

http://www.docs.hp.com/en/5991-2762/5991-2762.pdf

â ¢ Other Base-VXFS Enhancements
..........
â The largefiles option is now the default file size option for the mount command and
mkfs command.


Vxfs 4.1 supports layout 6, if you have this layout on HP-UX 11.23 or 11.31 systems you'll have largefiles optione enabled by default.

Best regards,
Fabio
WISH? IMPROVEMENT!
Honored Contributor
Laurent Menase
Posts: 1,079
Registered: ‎11-06-2003
Message 4 of 11 (302 Views)

Re: largefiles vs nolargefiles

on vxfs or hfs you can change to largefiles with a
fsadm -F vxfs -o largefiles /dev......
or
fsadm -F hfs -o largefiles /dev......

I think it is there more for historical compatibility problems.

- and for compatibility with some commands like tar for instance
Acclaimed Contributor
James R. Ferguson
Posts: 21,184
Registered: ‎07-06-2000
Message 5 of 11 (302 Views)

Re: largefiles vs nolargefiles

Hi:

> What is the internal difference between largefiles and nolargefiles. Why is it nolargefiles by default.?

As Laurent said, I too believe that this is in keeping with pre-10.0 releases. Largefile support first appeared with HP-UX 10.20 :

http://docs.hp.com/en/940/lgfiles4.pdf

Is there any problem in keeping largefiles while creating a filesystem.?

No, not at all.

Why there is an option.?

Consider that you might want filesystems in which it isn't possible to create or copy a largefile (i.e. one > 2GB). Allowing you the option is simply a nice feature!

Regards!

...JRF...
Honored Contributor
Honored Contributor
TTr
Posts: 3,434
Registered: ‎01-22-2008
Message 6 of 11 (302 Views)

Re: largefiles vs nolargefiles

> Why there is an option.?

There was a time when disks and volumes crossed the 2GB size and the need for largefiles support came about. HP-UX started supporting large disks/volumes/files via patches. In veritas the filesystem structure for smaller disks/volumes is different than that of larger disks.

During that time you could have servers at the same OS version that some did and some did not support largefiles. Also you could have in the SAME server, small and large disks, the small disks could NOT handle the largefiles option, the larger disks could. So the largefiles option was the only way to allow veritas to support the servers (with and without OS support and with small and large disks at the same time) during this transition period. Now that all servers have no need for the nolargefiles option, the largefiles is becoming the default and soon will probably be the standard and will not be an option anymore.
I do not reply to forumers who 1) consistently don't assign points, 2) ask for step-by-step instructions for a topic but appear to have no IT experience and make no effort to learn. Some exceptions for newcomers and special topics.
Esteemed Contributor
Sunny123_1
Posts: 413
Registered: ‎05-06-2009
Message 7 of 11 (302 Views)

Re: largefiles vs nolargefiles

Hi

largefiles can support file more than 2Gb in nolargefile you are limited to 2Gb not more than that.


Regards
Sunny
Honored Contributor
Hein van den Heuvel
Posts: 6,588
Registered: ‎05-19-2003
Message 8 of 11 (302 Views)

Re: largefiles vs nolargefiles

>> What is the internal difference between largefiles and nolargefiles.

1-bit

>> Why is it nolargefiles by default.?

Because HP-UX development is extremely conservative.

>> Is there any problem in keeping largefiles while creating a filesystem.?

None. Absolutely zero, as long as the 'stat' structure has 64 bits to store the size

>> Why there is an option.?

To protect old & broken applications which are using 32 bit integer to store seek/tell information, or otherwise report on file size
s using 32 bit integers from 'accidently' running into files larger than they can handle.

See: http://docs.hp.com/en/940/lgfiles4.pdf

Hein
Honored Contributor
dirk dierickx
Posts: 958
Registered: ‎12-20-1999
Message 9 of 11 (302 Views)

Re: largefiles vs nolargefiles

>> Why is it nolargefiles by default.?

Because HP-UX development is extremely conservative.


I had a good laugh about that one, so true...
Valued Contributor
sen_ux
Posts: 166
Registered: ‎10-01-2008
Message 10 of 11 (302 Views)

Re: largefiles vs nolargefiles

thanks for all your answers.
Acclaimed Contributor
James R. Ferguson
Posts: 21,184
Registered: ‎07-06-2000
Message 11 of 11 (302 Views)

Re: largefiles vs nolargefiles

Hi:

> thanks for all your answers.

Saying "thanks" is nice. So is assigning points to those who aided your understanding:

http://forums13.itrc.hp.com/service/forums/helptips.do?#28

...JRF...
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