What is CCRM? (1355 Views)
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chuck_darst
Posts: 175
Registered: ‎02-04-2010
Message 1 of 3 (1,355 Views)

What is CCRM?

As an introduction, I am the HP Product Marketing lead for the Change, Configuration, and Release Management (CCRM) solution. My background in this area involves stints working on provisioning solutions along with security and compliance from products, to process controls, and attestation.

The genesis of the HP Software solution for Change, Configuration, and Release Management (CCRM) included the challenges faced in improving both effectiveness and efficiency of the IT change process. There are the classic issues of change induced incidents and problems, dealing with escalating demands on the number of changes, and the associated compliance/audit issues of change. There are a variety of ways that IT organizations address these challenges and a corresponding breadth of maturity.

 

The core software components of the HP CCRM solution reflected the ITIL processes most closely aligned with change management. HP Service Manager (SM) provides the core process workflows. Release Control which has been bundled into SM’s Change module enables CAB virtualization and better proactive risk and impact analysis. A number of IT Organizations further benefited from incorporating discovery and dependency mapping (DDM). DDM unlocks a number of powerful use cases from CI-based impact analysis and potential change collision detection, to unplanned change detection, and change validation. These capabilities are then knitted together by the UCMDB which is the core of HP’s approach for enabling federated configuration management.

I submit that change extending to configuration & release is the most interconnected of IT Service Management (ITSM) process areas. As such, CCRM could logically include all sorts of related components and processes such as service portfolio management, catalogs, request fulfillment, asset management, obviously release & deployment, and incident & problem management, … . To get an overview of the HP view on CCRM, I would suggest reading a white paper - Transforming change: four steps toward more effective change management (0.67MB, PDF)

 

I am looking forward to hearing what issues and approaches you are taking and the associated dialog.

Chuck Darst

http://www.hp.com/blogs/ITSM

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Occasional Advisor
bettys
Posts: 11
Registered: ‎04-06-2010
Message 2 of 3 (1,355 Views)

Re: What is CCRM?

Chuck

 

the one area we are struggling with a little is how to effectively extend the integration between Service Manager change and Release Control.  The power that Release Control brings to the table with regards to impact analysis and automating your risk is great.  The challenge is how can you bring that information back into Service Manager to allow further business processing logic. 

 

For example, if the risk and impact is high, we would like to automatically put additional approver groups on the ticket for further review/scrutiny.  or send an alert.  But the workflow is already progressing before a response can come back from Release Control.  The user is not waiting in that ticket for a response, they have moved on to the next ticket.

 

Also, are there users that are sending alerts and notifications out of both Service Manager and Release Control?  If so where is the line being drawn - which notifications come out of which application and is it confusing to the users?

 

thanks

betty

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Jovsta
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎09-01-2010
Message 3 of 3 (1,355 Views)

Re: What is CCRM?

Chuck - the link to the PDF is no longer valid. Anyone know where we can get a copy?

 

Betty - Regarding notification, my understanding is once you've integrated RC with SM, the CAB notification should be managed by RC as it has the higher level view of the Change.

 

The challange is getting Configuration information right in uCMDB, which is why this product is the foundation for a number of HP BTO software.

 

 

J

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