Infrastructure Management Software Blog

HP Service Health Optimizer – “Business Aware” Capacity Management for the virtualized datacenter

HP Software has a comprehensive set of products to manage a Virtualized datacenter effectively. Customers who are already reaping the benefits of HP’s industry leading systems management products, such as Operations Manager, Performance Agents have a new arsenal in their toolkit now – HP Service Health Optimizer – a “Business Aware” Capacity Management, focused on virtualization.

Virtualization Capacity Management – an emerging challenge

“Almost half of the workloads will be deployed in virtual environments by 2012”*

“Virtual Machine installed base to grow by 5x in 3 years between 2009 and 2012”*

“By 2012, there will be nearly 55M VMs”*

“Average number of VMs per server might explode to 75 by 2012”*

*Various sources, such as IDC, Gartner and Forrester

 

Pre-virtualization, server utilization was typically under 20%. Now, with virtualization, it's still less than 50%. What is preventing server admins from achieving higher utilization?

 

 

Managing HP Servers - combining System Insight Management with HP Operations Manager

The Insight Integration for HP Operations Manager for Windows integrates hardware management data and event notifications for HP Servers, HP Storage, and HP client systems into the OMW console.

OH, IL, WI, IN, MI Operations Center Technical Roadshow - April 20th to April 29th - Don't miss it!

Ever wish you could talk face-to-face with more technical people about Operations Center and Network Management Center products? Don’t really have the time or budget to travel very far to do so?  Well, here is a great opportunity to meet and talk with technical experts on products like Operations Manager and NNMi – right in your background.


Vivit will be hosting a series of six (6) one-day sessions, where there will be a nice mix between presentations and Q&A sessions around these products.  The sessions will be held in the following states on the following days:


- (Columbus) Ohio – April 20, 2010


- (Orrville) Ohio – April 21, 2010


- (Dearborn) Michigan – April 22, 2010


- Wisconsin – April 27, 2010


- (Chicago) Illinois – April 28, 2010


 - (Fishers) Indiana – April 29, 2010


Feel free to contact me if you have any further questions about this roadshow at asksonja@hp.com.

Labels: agent| agentless| agentless monitoring| agents| automating operations management| automation| BES| BlackBerry Enterprise Server| CMDB| consolidate events| consolidated event| Consolidated Event and Performance Management| consolidated event management| Consolidated Management| correlate events| DDM| Discovery and Dependency Mapping| event console| event consolidation| event correlation| event management| Hewlett Packard| HP Network Node Manager| HP OMi| HP OpenView| HP Operations Center| HP Operations Manager| infrastructure management| infrastructure monitoring| IT dashboard| IT infrastructure management| IT infrastructure monitoring| IT management| manager of managers| managing IT| managing IT infrastructure| managing IT operations| monitoring| Network Management| Network Node Manager| NNM| NNMi| Norm Follett| OM| OMi| OML| OMU| OMU 9.0| OMW| OpenView| OpenView Operations| Operations Center| Operations Manager| Operations Manager i| Operations Manager on Linux| Operations Manager on Unix| Operations Manager on Windows| performance| Performance Agent| performance management| Performance Manager| performance monitoring| SiteScope| Smart Plug-in| Sonja Hickey| SPI| TBEC| Topology Based Event Correlation| topology-based event correlation| virtual server| virtual servers| virtual systems management| virtualization management| Virtualization SPI| virtualization sprawl| virtualization strategy| virtualizationation| virtualized environment| virtualized environments| Virtualized Infrastructure| Vivit

Learn how Independence Blue Cross reduced IT Operations costs

Join HP Software and Solutions for a live InformationWeek webcast with special guests Maryann Phillip, Director of Service Delivery at Independence Blue Cross (IBC), and Ken Herold, Practice Manager & Principal Architect with Melillo Consulting.


Hear first-hand how IBC is using HP Operations Center products like Operations Manager, Performance Manager, and DDM in addition to agentless and agent-based data collection to:



  • achieve profitable growth through enabling technologies

  • reduce costs by achieving a competitive cost structure

  • manage medical costs better -- through operational stability & improvements


Register today and learn how you can streamline and make YOUR processes more efficient.

Top blog posts of 2009

Happy New Year.


In addition to celebrating the New Year, this also represents the one year anniversary of the Infrastructure Management Software blog. Thank you to the thousands of people who read the blog and share your insights with the rest of the community. I would like to reflect on the past year by listing the top blog posts.


VMware: the Next Infrastructure Management Behemoth? (March 4, 2009)


Enhancing SiteScope with Operations Manager - and Vice Versa (August 3, 2009)


Operations Manager Basics (product overview videos) (October 21, 2009)


Q&A from EMA webinar on incident management and OMi (July 29, 2009)


Virtual Infrastructure Management (Q&A from HP-VMware webinar) (October 14, 2009)


Everything you wanted to know about OMi... (Q&A from Vivit technical webinar) (July 31, 2009)


Virtualization Management - Only Part of the Consolidation Picture (March 11, 2009)


Hawaii Pacific Health – Data Center Transformation (download success story) (July 23, 2009)


The full stack (OMW, SiteScope, OMi, NNM, Service Desk, CMDB) (October 16, 2009)


The new competitive landscape (July 28, 2009)


Rip and Replace - Never (Operations Manager has 15 years of stability) (June 10, 2009)


HP Positioned in the Leader Quadrant in Gartner's Magic Quadrant for IT Event Correlation (July 30, 2009)


For HP Operations Center, Peter Spielvogel.



Get the latest updates on our Twitter feed @HPITOps http://twitter.com/HPITOps


Join the HP OpenView & Operations Management group on LinkedIn.

Operations Manager Basics (product overview videos)

I spent the past two days in a planning meeting with my product marketing peers from different product groups including infrastructure monitoring, application monitoring, network monitoring, CMDB, service management, and IT financial management. We reviewed all our respective product plans and our go to market strategies (you will need to watch during the year to learn what we decided). While everyone had some idea about what high-level problems each product line solves, some people were not familiar with specific Operations Manager functionality, especially the current version's capabilities.


They asked for the fastest and easiest way to come up to speed. After some thought, I pointed them to two videos - one for Operations Manager (focused on consolidated event and performance management) and another for Operations Manager i (focused on advanced event reduction using topology-based event correlation). I have posted the links below.


HP Operations Manager
Peter Spielvogel and Jon Haworth discuss how Operations Manager allows customers to monitor heterogeneous IT environments, reduce management costs, and speed time to problem resolution.

(While the demo is on Operations Manager on Windows (OMW), the functionality is virtually the same for Operations Manager on Linux (OML) and Operations Manager on Unix (OMU).)



HP Operations Manager i
Jon Haworth and Dan Haller talk about increasing IT event processing efficiency with OMi.



If you have additional questions, please let me know.


For HP Operations Center, Peter Spielvogel.


Get the latest updates on our Twitter feed @HPITOps http://twitter.com/HPITOps


Join the HP OpenView & Operations Management group on LinkedIn.


 

The full stack (OMW, SiteScope, OMi, NNM, Service Desk, CMDB)

As I was getting ready to leave yesterday, a colleague stopped by my desk and asked “do you want to be a hero?” That certainly peaked my interest. It turned out we had a customer downstairs in our executive briefing center that wanted some clarification about all the pieces of our stack fit together.


Background
The customer was the CTO of a major IT firm in the Asia-Pacific region. They manage approximately 4,000 servers using OMW 8.1. They use both agents and SPIs, as well as SiteScope agentless monitoring. In addition, they monitor the faults and performance of their network using NNM, and roll those events into their Operations Manager console. In addition, they use Service Desk 4.5 along with a CMDB (configuration management database) that tracks all the configuration items and relationships among them across their enterprise. A *very* rough schematic  of what they have appears in the diagram below in red.



 Our discussions were divided into two main areas:
1. What they are doing today and what they should be doing?
2. What can they do in the future?


Current Situation
The first question was about best practices. Were they using the software correctly to manage their infrastructure? The answer is a resounding yes. They use OMW as the central event management console, collecting data from agents, SiteScope (agentless monitoring), and NNM for network events.


And, they integrate their service desk with OMW, opening and closing tickets, and tracking changes to the IT infrastructure in their CMDB. They implemented the CMDB about two years ago, in conjunction with their Service Desk implementation.


Next Steps
The next questions focused on what should they be doing or what can they do next to improve their IT management.


We started with a discussion about OMi. The customer was confused about how OMi fits with OMW - the first question was whether it replaces OMW, whether they receive OMi as part of an upgrade (entitlement), and finally, what specific value OMi provides since they currently use OMW as the centralized event consolidation tool.


As readers of this blog know, OMi is a separate product that adds on to Operations Manager. (See green box at top of the above diagram). Its main value is that it leverage the system topology information in the CMDB to greatly speed the time to repair IT problems, especially in complex environments. We have many resources to learn more about OMi, including:
Product overview
High-level webinar on OMi
Deep-dive technical webinar on OMi
Answers to technical questions on OMi


The next topic was automation. We talked about how companies use Operations Orchestration (OO)  to automate their IT processes (runbooks). OO uses events in OM to trigger its process flows. The good news was that this customer has spent the past two years documenting and improving their IT processes. They already know what processes occur frequently and how much manual effort they require. This may be the next logical step for them as it leverages their existing IT infrastructure and processes. EMA recently write a white paper on how process automation augments event consolidation.


Migration Challenges
One issue that arose was that the CMDB connected to their service desk is not the latest UCMDB that OMi uses for its topology-based event correlation (TBEC). The customer has two options here.
1. Leave the existing CMDB in place and let OMi create an operational data store that contains the configuration information it needs. The advantage of this approach is that it leaves the current management infrastructure intact and just adds OMi on top. OMi uses the SPIs to auto-discover the IT infrastructure and relationships among the elements. OMi’s data store is self-contained and requires minimal external input.
2. Migrate the existing CMDB associated with Service Desk to the latest version of UCMDB. The advantage of this approach is that the customer ends up with a single CMDB. They can migrate their existing data using a tool such as ICM (information consolidation manager) from Netscope.


Conclusions
For organizations already integrating their events into a single Operations Manager console, you are on the right track. If you already use a CMDB to track your IT infrastructure, you are very far along the IT management maturity curve, even more so if you use some means of automatic discovery to keep it current.


To take things to the next level, you have two options: focus on further event correlation and reduction with OMi or automate your existing IT processes with Operations Orchestration. You can pursue these in series or in parallel, depending on your priorities. Both will deliver a tangible return on investment and fast payback period.


For HP Operations Center, Peter Spielvogel.


Get the latest updates on our Twitter feed @HPITOps http://twitter.com/HPITOps


Join the HP OpenView & Operations Management group onLinkedIn.

We Live and Die by Operations Manager (customer visit summary)

The absence of posts over the past two weeks was a result of traveling to meet customers as well as some of our partners. This is the first of several meeting summaries. Look for more examples of how customers use Operations Manager in upcoming posts.
- Peter


I was recently part of a team that spent half a day with one of our financial services customers. The agenda was focused around their current Operations Manager implementation and future plans, which include a new data center.


We also reviewed their feedback on the Operations Manager on Linux beta. Migrating to Linux will help them retire several aging Solaris servers. In addition, once they are comfortable with OML, they will migrate some OMW servers to OML.


They presented many charts and graphs about the types of events they manage and how they use Operations Manager along with several other HP and open source products. The volume of events they receive directly correlates with the trading volume in the market. Because of the number of events, they only keep history in Operations Manager for two days. They use a product called Splunk to search their historical log files.


Their architecture includes the usual high availability fail over systems distributed across multiple geographically separated data centers. They also gave us a demo that highlighted several use cases so we could see how they used our products in action.


One highlight of the day was a tour of their Operations Bridge. Dozens of screens showed events, system health, and performance. Operators each had about six monitors at their station. In addition, several large monitors at the front of the room called out the key screens, giving visibility to critical systems (as measured by business impact).


Of course, virtualization came up during our discussions. As with other financial service customers I have met, most of their virtualization is used for development and test systems. Production systems cannot afford even the small overhead that virtual hosts impose.


One great benefit of talking to power users such as this company is that they push the product (and product managers) to the limit. This is the sort of feedback that allows us to prioritize enhancements and make sure we are aligned with how our customers use the product.


During the close, our host stated “We live and die by Operations Manager”. This underscores the important role Operations Manager plays in customer environments. They use OM to ensure their systems meet the service level agreements to their customers by providing the optimal level of availability and performance.


For HP Operations Center, Peter Spielvogel.


Get the latest updates on our Twitter feed @HPITOps http://twitter.com/HPITOps


Join the HP OpenView & Operations Management group onLinkedIn.

Introducing Operations Manager on Linux

Thanks to Lillian Hull, Product Manager for Operations Manager on Linux for providing the background information and customer quotes for this blog post.
- Peter


HP Operations Manager has long had the ability to monitor Linux servers. We are now getting ready to release a version of Operations Manager that runs on Linux. This complements our existing Operations Manager on Windows (OMW) and Operations Manager on Unix (OMU).


Linux penguin


At HP Software Universe in June 2009, HP disclosed that Operations Manager on Linux was in external pre-release review (many software companies call this a beta program). Here is some of the feedback we received:



  • “This is the smoothest installation I’ve ever done.” 

  • “We downloaded OMU 8 polices and uploaded to OM Linux and verified they were viewable and editable in the new Administration UI.  These steps went without any problems.”

  • “For everything we tried, OM Linux is rock solid.”


Customers are moving to Linux for several reasons. The key drivers include: desire to standardize on a single platform, cost reduction, find an alternative to Windows, and leverage open source solutions including customizing them to meet specific domain-specific needs.


Giving customers the ability to run Operations Manager on Linux will complement HP’s support of Linux on HP Integrity servers and HP Proliant servers.


We have now successfully completed the external pre-release review phase of this program and are actively working towards general availability of this exciting new offering.


For HP Operations Center, Peter Spielvogel.


Get the latest updates on our Twitter feed @HPITOps http://twitter.com/HPITOps


Join the HP OpenView & Operations Management group onLinkedIn.

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