Infrastructure Management Software Blog

Measure what matters. KPIs for IT Operations

IT Operations staff have measured what matters for decades. They have successfully used products such as HP Operations Center (and its predecessor HP OpenView Operations) to define metrics and track them to manage increasingly complex IT infrastructures. One challenge has been rolling up this data - connecting the information across disparate parts of the business so corporate and IT executives could manage holistically.

Update from Citrix Synergy show - virtualization management

Update from the show floor from John Lee and Rajkishore Govindu, two HP product experts, who are staffing the HP Software booth at Citrix Synergy. They are showing demos of how HP Operations Manager and our Citrix management solutions

See HP Operations Manager at Citrix Synergy Show

HP software provides a way for you to monitor your Citrix virtualized resources alongside all other components in your IT environment. Monitor all Citrix application, desktop, and server virtualized resources using either agent-based or agentless monitoring technologies from HP. And bring all of this information into a central location, greatly increasing the efficiencies of your IT Operations teams.  

Agent-Based Monitoring: Benefits of Local Data Collection, Correlation, and Corrective Actions

There is a never-ending debate on which is better - agent-based or agentless - when it comes to monitoring your IT environment. There are advantages to both.  Read this blog post to learn more about the advantages of agent-based monitoring – “hard to beat” benefits by deploying agents on nodes being monitored - and how this type of monitoring  may even help with ITIL’s Event, Incident, and Problem Management processes.

Maximize your investment in Operations Manager, SiteScope, OpenView: Free Practitioner Forum (best practices)

Announcing the launch of the HP Operations Center practitioner's forum where you can interact with other Operations Manager, SiteScope, OpenView customers and HP Subject Matter Experts to share your experiences, learn best practices and get pressing questions answered.

Service Health Reporter - service centric, cross domain reporting for dynamic IT infrastructure

You collect performance metrics and response time statistics throughout your environment, and you have a dynamic model of the IT infrastructure and the business services - so what happens if you bring the two sets of data together?

Mobile Provider uses HP Operations Manager to increase availability by 10% (Customer Success Story)

Consolidated operations drives efficiency. In this example, the leading mobile telephony distribution network in France has standardized on HP Operations Manager and HP Network Node Manager to optimize their IT operations.

Taking heterogeneous monitoring to the next level with HP Operations Manager

HP often discusses how customers can use HP Operations Center to manage heterogeneous IT environments. While HP prefers that customers use both HP servers, storage, and networking hardware and HP software to manage them, the reality is that most organizations use hardware and management software from multiple vendors.

 

One of the newest server vendors recently approached us to allow their customers to manage their systems using HP Operations Manager.

Do you use OpenView?

Of course this is a trick question. HP changed the name of OpenView several years ago. The solution that is the main topic of this blog, HP Operations Manager, was formerly OpenView Operations or OVO. If you are interested in a mapping of all the former OpenView products and their new names...

There is no such thing as agentless monitoring

I often hear people trying to make sense of "agent or agentless" monitoring.

 

The reality is that (for most purposes) there is no such thing as agentless monitoring.

Does ITIL v3 require good IT monitoring solutions? Is Service Operation the key?

Recently I attended a 3-day ITIL v3 Foundation training course. While there are 5 stages in the lifecycle of an IT Service, according to the ITIL framework, “Service Operation” or the 4th stage is “where the customer really sees the value” (according to my course materials). What does this mean? It means that having a good IT monitoring solution in place is an absolute necessity.

Managing HP Servers - combining System Insight Management with HP Operations Manager

The Insight Integration for HP Operations Manager for Windows integrates hardware management data and event notifications for HP Servers, HP Storage, and HP client systems into the OMW console.

Data Collection: Smart Plug-Ins (SPIs) explained in deeper detail ...

This post is basically a follow-in to my post from February 16, 2010 entitled “Smart Plug-Ins (SPIs) and Agent-Based/Agentless Data Collection Explained: What you need to manage your IT environment”.


To reiterate, an HP Operations Manager solution consists basically of two things: an Operations Manager management server and data collection technologies. Data collection technologies, at a very high level, are either agent-based or agentless. The purpose of this post is to go into further detail around agent-based data collection – specifically, how SPIs or Smart Plug-Ins assist in agent-based data collection.  Referring to the graphic in the attachment to this post, I will be talking about that little thing labeled “App SPI”:


Application SPIs reside on a node that hosts the application you want to monitor.  Each SPI is basically a “bundle” of functionality that addresses detailed monitoring of a specific application and assists in the following:



  • monitoring availability of the application

  • discovering applications on an automatic basis

  • collecting performance data of the application at a regular interval

  • sending alert messages to HP Operations Manager in the event of a threshold violation

  • visualizing performance behavior of the application over a period of time, by providing data to HP Reporter (when used with HP Operations Manager)

  • providing instruction text along with alert messages


The process of data collection and alert generation is governed by sets of rules called policies, which must be deployed on the managed nodes in order to start collecting data. A policy is essentially a combination of several rules and specifications that define:
• Types of data that can be collected from the node
• Mechanism to collect the data
• Collection interval
• Mechanism to generate an alert at the event of threshold violation


Policies are comprised of attributes, each of which has a specific value or setting.  The value of each attribute determines the manner in which the policy behaves to collect information. For example, the polling interval of Microsoft’s Active Directory Directory Information Tree (DIT) —ADSPI-DIT_TotalDITSize, a Microsoft Active Directory SPI policy—is set to 24 hours. This attribute value defines how frequently this policy should poll data from the node.


Every HP Operations SPI is equipped with out-of-the-box, default policies, which allow you to quickly start monitoring your applications. You can customize these out-of-the-box policies - using HP Operations Manager - to enhance the application monitoring process and optimally manage your IT environment.  Continuing with the ADSPI-DIT_TotalDITSize policy example mentioned above, you could set the polling internal of this policy to 12 hours by changing the appropriate attribute. As soon as you change the attribute value, the SPI creates a new version of the policy. Basically, you are changing the base version (the original version of the policy) and creating a new customer version of the policy—the version that includes the customization done by you.


There are many application SPIs for HP Operations Manager, either developed and offered by HP or developed by third-party vendors, that cover the following areas:



  • databases such as Oracle, Microsoft SQL Server, IBM DB2, Informix, and Sybase

  • web application servers such as WebLogic, WebSphere, and JBoss

  • ERP/CRM such as PeopleSoft, SAP, Siebel, and TIBCO

  • mail servers such as Exchange and Lotus Notes

  • BlackBerry environments

  • document management such as EMC Documentum and IBM FileNet Image Services


I hope you have learned something from this post and, as always, please feel free to comment on it or send an e-mail to me at asksonja@hp.com.  I would love to hear your thoughts and/or ideas on other topics of interest that should be discussed in this blog.


Sonja Hickey


For HP Operations Center, Sonja Hickey.


Get the latest updates on our Twitter feed @HPITOps http://twitter.com/HPITOps


Join the HP OpenView & Operations Management group on LinkedIn.

Simplify your life! Upgrade you HP Operations SPIs with ease!!!

I’m a big time Quicken fan and just upgraded to the latest version. As with many upgrade processes, here are some of the issues I encountered before, during, and after the migration process:


- First, I hesitated – for 3+ years - to upgrade to the latest version of Quicken. I really wanted to take advantage of all the great things Intuit has introduced, but was concerned that the upgrade would be difficult and time-consuming.


- During the upgrade process, I ended up doing a lot of manual spot checking and comparison of data between my older and newer versions of Quicken. Certainly a frustration …. as well as VERY time-consuming!


- After the upgrade was complete, I soon realized that a lot of the customization and personalization that I had done over the past 3+ years was lost – gone for good AND not apparent to me during the upgrade process.


Sound familiar???


It’s a shame that something as seemingly simple as moving to the latest version of a product can be so daunting, complex, and time-consuming – causing you to ultimately delay performing the upgrade.


Well, this is not the case when upgrading your HP Operations SPIs (Smart Plug-ins) because of a great new tool we’ve introduced – called the SPI Upgrade Toolkit  or SUTK.  Now you can quickly and easily move to the latest version of a SPI, so that you can take advantage of the enhanced and/or new monitoring and management capabilities of your IT environment; in other words, better monitor and manage and technologies and environments such as virtualized servers, BlackBerry applications, application servers (JBoss, WebLogic, and WebSphere), databases (Oracle, Informix, and DB2), and much more. Like my Quicken dilemma, you shouldn’t hold off upgrading because you fear what the upgrade process is going to be.


We’ve made it easy to upgrade your SPIs!!!


This toolkit allows you to quickly and easily upgrade to the latest version of a SPI as follows:


- Any customization(s) you have done around policies are NOT lost during the upgrade process, ensuring all work and effort you have done in the past stays intact.


- Changes made to any policy during the upgrade process are reported and brought to your attention BEFORE they are made, thus eliminating the possibility of overwriting policy customizations you’ve done in the past.


- From a performance standpoint, the process is quick, as it takes less than one second per policy comparison.


- Again, the process is quick, as you are provided – in a summary format – policy comparisons that are in an easy-to-read and digest format.


- The toolkit has an intuitive, easy-to-use interface that allows you to quickly and easily perform an upgrade.


The attachment to this post shows how the upgrade would work if you have customized any policies associated with a SPI that you are upgrading.


Best of all – the toolkit is FREE! Simply download it (ftp://sutk:Andante0@ftp.usa.hp.com/) and then launch it from HP Operations Manager and you’re ready to go! (Note: This is a large download.)


And, per usual, we’d love to get comments and feedback on the toolkit. Feel free to comment on this post or e-mail me with your input on how your upgrade went when using this tool! I look forward to hearing from you.


Sonja Hickey


For HP Operations Center, Sonja Hickey.


Get the latest updates on our Twitter feed @HPITOps http://twitter.com/HPITOps


Join the HP OpenView & Operations Management group on LinkedIn.

OH, IL, WI, IN, MI Operations Center Technical Roadshow - April 20th to April 29th - Don't miss it!

Ever wish you could talk face-to-face with more technical people about Operations Center and Network Management Center products? Don’t really have the time or budget to travel very far to do so?  Well, here is a great opportunity to meet and talk with technical experts on products like Operations Manager and NNMi – right in your background.


Vivit will be hosting a series of six (6) one-day sessions, where there will be a nice mix between presentations and Q&A sessions around these products.  The sessions will be held in the following states on the following days:


- (Columbus) Ohio – April 20, 2010


- (Orrville) Ohio – April 21, 2010


- (Dearborn) Michigan – April 22, 2010


- Wisconsin – April 27, 2010


- (Chicago) Illinois – April 28, 2010


 - (Fishers) Indiana – April 29, 2010


Feel free to contact me if you have any further questions about this roadshow at asksonja@hp.com.

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Learn how Independence Blue Cross reduced IT Operations costs

Join HP Software and Solutions for a live InformationWeek webcast with special guests Maryann Phillip, Director of Service Delivery at Independence Blue Cross (IBC), and Ken Herold, Practice Manager & Principal Architect with Melillo Consulting.


Hear first-hand how IBC is using HP Operations Center products like Operations Manager, Performance Manager, and DDM in addition to agentless and agent-based data collection to:



  • achieve profitable growth through enabling technologies

  • reduce costs by achieving a competitive cost structure

  • manage medical costs better -- through operational stability & improvements


Register today and learn how you can streamline and make YOUR processes more efficient.

Extending out-of-the-box integration capabilities of HP software products with APIs

A guest post by Alfred Hermann, technical marketing manager for Operations Center.
- Peter


I was looking at Closed Loop Incident Process (CLIP) and wanted to introduce a new member of the HP operations family of products, Operations Manager i (OMi).  My goal was to use OMi as the only operational console, as I hate to switch between consoles for day-to-day operational tasks.


It quickly became apparent that there are many out-of-the-box integrations with HP Service Manager, but no direct integration between OMi and Service Manager. Since OMi is still relatively new, it does not contain some of the integration adapters. However, there is an existing integration between HP Operations Manager and HP Service Manager, and as OMi sits on top of HP Operations Manager, I explored some of the existing OM interfaces hoping to improve the situation.


And this is what I wanted to achieve: OMi has some fancy capabilities around topology based event correlation (TBEC), and thus can identify cause/symptom relationships between events. The existing “scauto” based integration between HP Operations Manager and HP Service Manager, however, will not exchange this important piece of information, a user at the Service Manager console is unable to see how events that have become incidents are related.


What I found is that HP Operations Manager (in my case the Windows management server version) has a wealth of WMI interfaces. Some of them can be used to investigate OM messages as they are stored on the OM for Windows management server. You can walk through the set of CMAs that are attached to an OM message, and create new annotations. In my case I was looking for a particular CMA “CauseEventId” being added to the message, and generated out of that an annotation. The interesting thing is that annotations are synchronized between Operations Manager and Service manager, and as a result of adding a small VB script and a WMI policy I was able to synchronize causal message relationships.


This leads me to the question how widely APIs are used with eg. HP Operations Manager for Windows? Please comment if you have been able to extend the product’s out-of-the-box capabilities by using the provided interfaces.


For HP Operations Center, Alfred Hermann.


Get the latest updates on our Twitter feed @HPITOps http://twitter.com/HPITOps


Join the HP OpenView & Operations Management group on LinkedIn.

Does it take a rocket scientist to manage IT? (customer visit summary)

I recently had the opportunity to meet with a long-time HP customer at our executive briefing center. They were visiting to learn best practices about making their infrastructure more agile to allow tighter collaboration among different parts of their network. Increasing their operational efficiency was another key concern.


The customer brought a team of nine people consisting of architects, engineers, business systems analysts, and IT managers. The agenda included an overview of several HP product centers, including Business Service Management. We focused on the non-classified part of their network, which still contained several tiers of security, ranging from “open” to “sensitive”.


One interesting part of the day was a tour of an HP POD (Performance-Optimized Datacenter). It looks like a standard 40-foot shipping container, but contains a complete datacenter, consisting of 22 racks that can accommodate over 3500 blade servers. All you do is connect power and cooling water and you have instant capacity. This beats the roughly two years to bring a standard datacenter online.


On the software side, they use products from practically every major vendor. One challenge with this approach is integrating all the pieces together. SiteScope (agentless monitoring) comprises one part of their monitoring solution. I had a long discussion with their IT Manager of production systems about how to leverage what they have and extend their IT management with HP Operations Center. (Read a solution brief about HP Operations Manager for HP SiteScope customers.)
Over time, they plan to simplify their infrastructure monitoring by relying a few key tools.


After reviewing the entire HP BTO portfolio, we whiteboarded several different approaches they could follow to evolve their infrastructure. After some debate about the relative value and dependencies, everyone agreed that starting with a CMDB project made the most sense. Why? Because all the other planned projects will rely on the CMDB for information about the infrastructure, the relationships among configuration items, and how these relate to their business services. For example, Operations Manager i (OMi) combines event streams with information in the CMDB (using a technology called topology-based event correlation or TBEC) to determine the causal event when several related events hit the console around the same time.


This will prove to be a very interesting project as it evolves over the next several years.


For HP Operations Center, Peter Spielvogel.


Get the latest updates on our Twitter feed @HPITOps http://twitter.com/HPITOps


Join the HP OpenView & Operations Management group on LinkedIn.

Managing thresholds: too much or not enough

My colleague Amy Feldman wrote an interesting post on the Application Management blog about using threshold values. While its focus is on managing performance, the information is also relevant to managing system metrics in Operations Manager. I recommend you check out her post, which is part one of a series.


For HP Operations Center, Peter Spielvogel.


Get the latest updates on our Twitter feed @HPITOps http://twitter.com/HPITOps


Join the HP OpenView & Operations Management group on LinkedIn.

BlackBerry Management Webinar (Empowering a Mobile Workforce)

We have written about the challenges of managing Black Berry Enterprise Server environments, mostly because of all the disparate elements that must work together properly to ensure that people receive their email. For a user to successfully send or receive a message, the following applications must interact smoothly: BlackBerry Enterprise Server, Microsoft Exchange, Microsoft Active Directory, and Microsoft SQL Server.


You can imagine the challenge of troubleshooting performance problems if you do not have a single console from which to manage faults and performance data. When the CEO is calling about his or her email, I would certainly want an easy way to determine when the service will be back online.


If you manage BlackBerry Enterprise Servers, you will certainly want to attend this.


One lucky attendee will win a BlackBerry (actual device will depend on your coverage area)!



TitleEmpowering a Mobile Workforce: A Holistic Approach to Managing your BlackBerry Ecosystem
Date: Wednesday, November 4, 2009
Time: 11 am Pacific / 2 pm Eastern / Check Your Time Zone
Additional Speakers:
- Pierluigi Buonicore, Product Manager, Research in Motion (RIM)
- Jonathan Evans, Product Marketing, Research in Motion (RIM)
- Jon Haworth,Product Marketing Manager, HP


Behind every executive’s BlackBerry is a complex IT infrastructure for delivering messages and mission-critical mobile applications. So, when performance or availability issues occur, the Operations Team has no time to waste in identifying the cause of the problem and fixing it. Using a single event monitoring console improves visibility across the BlackBerry ecosystem and streamlines communications among your subject matter expert teams - enabling faster problem resolution and less downtime.


In this one-hour webinar EMA VP Dennis Drogseth, Research in Motion (RIM) Product Manager Pierluigi Buonicore, Jonathan Evans from RIM Product Marketing, and HP Product Marketing Manager Jon Haworth will explore solutions that will enable a holistic support environment for managing BlackBerry resources across the enterprise.  Topics of discussion will include how to:



  • Identify the most common challenges to enterprise BlackBerry management

  • Utilize best practices, such as ITIL, to increase the supportability of mobile devices

  • Enable prompt problem identification and improved time to resolution

  • Evaluate new solutions that will enable a common interface for managing enterprise BlackBerry support services


This is a can’t-miss event for any organization supporting BlackBerry devices or looking to empower their mobile workforce.
Register now (and have a chance to win a BlackBerry).


For HP Operations Center, Peter Spielvogel.


Get the latest updates on our Twitter feed @HPITOps http://twitter.com/HPITOps


Join the HP OpenView & Operations Management group on LinkedIn.

Your success is my success (customer visit summary)

Another guest post by Lillian Hull, product manager for Operations Manager on Unix.
- Peter Spielvogel


Earlier this month, my colleagues and I spent some time with one of our customers in the health insurance sector. They were interested in our plans around Operations Manager and in particular, Operations Manager i.


Their environment includes a variety of HP Software & Solutions products including Operations Manager on UNIX (OMU), Business Availability Center (BAC), Discovery and Dependency Mapping (DDM), Network Node Manager (NNM) and SiteScope (SiS). 


The portfolio is well-integrated and users familiar with BAC should feel right at home with OMi.  OMi can provide a single “operations bridge” to reduce operational costs. All events are sent to the operations bridge and monitored by staff well-versed in IT operations. This centralization makes it easier to distinguish between causes and symptoms to better isolate the cause of a set of events. This in turn leads to more rapid problem resolution.


As with many of our customers, another topic they wanted to talk more about was virtualization. They are using Linux and virtual machines. For many environments, the slight overhead of running OM in a virtual machine should not have significant impact on performance or scalability.


Finally, during the wrap-up, the customer told us how much they want to work with us and our host said that our success with Operations Manager is linked to his success as an infrastructure architect. His words were “your success is my success”. Our products are vital to keeping everything running smoothly in this organization. HP is very fortunate to have customers that share their insights with us as not just another vendor, but as a trusted adviser. And due to great customers like this one, I am confident we will both triumph.


For HP Operations Center, Lillian Hull.


Get the latest updates on our Twitter feed @HPITOps http://twitter.com/HPITOps


Join the HP OpenView & Operations Management group onLinkedIn.

Q&A from EMA webinar on incident management and OMi

Thank you to everyone who attended the EMA webinar on “What is New in the Not-so-New Area of Event Management: Five Tips to Reduce Incident Resolution Costs” (view the archived webinar by clicking on the link).


We had many great questions at the end, some of which we did not have time to answer. Here is a complete list of all the questions that were asked, along with the answers. If you have additional questions, please post them in the comment field on the blog.


 


What effect will cloud computing have on the management strategies you discussed?


In many respects, Cloud computing – if it’s to be successful as a responsible answer to optimizing infrastructure for business applications – will accelerate the need for consolidated event management and its associated technologies.  Cloud computing places many new complexities and a stress and real-time awareness in front of IT managers, including how to manage performance, change, and costs effectively across virtualized environments and potentially across a mix of external service providers wedded together in a dynamic ecosystem.  These requirements will force service providers to become more transparent in support of SLAs, performance management, infrastructure discovery, CMDB Systems and CMS involvements, and shared cost analysis, along with compliance, security and risk management issues.  In other words, Cloud computing cannot succeed except as a niche opportunity without embracing the best practices and process-centric programs within IT to optimize its own internal effectiveness.


As you all know, security event management is a domain in its own right, and there is as much interest in cross-domain integration of security processes & tools as in other areas, if not more so in some cases. How can unified event management help security and IT ops team achieve their common goals?


Security event integration with an overall consolidated event management system is one of the more challenging and also more valuable areas of consideration.  This is partly because rather than being a “component-defined” part of the infrastructure or SW environment, security is pervasively associated with all domains and all disciplines.   It is something like the “phantom” in event management-a more logical than tangible entity.  But as such, defining polices for integration and reconciliation are more complex and overall less evolved.  Of course security has its own well established history in event management, in particular with SIEM—but once again this evolved as a way of consolidating security-related event issues, rather than being a more holistic approach to integrating security events with performance and change related events.  And so to a large degree this challenge still remains unanswered by the industry as a whole.


Is OMi a replacement for OM?


No. OMi is a separate product that adds on to Operations Manager. OMi introduces advanced functionality such as system health indicators and topology-based event correlation using Operations Manager as the event consolidation platform. We designed the products in this way to allow our customers to gain significant new capabilities without disrupting their current Operations Manager deployment. There is no rip and replace, just adding a new component on top of the existing monitoring solution.


OMI looks alot like BAC, are they tightly coupled?  Do I need both?


So is BAC and OMi the same product now?


Great observation. OMi is built on the BAC foundation so they do share a common look and feel. OMi performs advanced event management. BAC handles application management, transaction monitoring, and problem isolation. You can mix and match to components from the two product sets to meet the needs of your organization and you only need to purchase the components that fit your needs. So, OMi and BAC are separate products, just tightly integrated.



Sounds great, but what is the cost?  Is there some way to justify the big cash outlay for IT organizations in SMBs?


The return on investment should be apparent. As we covered in the presentation, if you assume the cost per manually handling an event is $75 and OMi will eliminate processing of around 10% of events (conservative estimate), just determine how many events your Operations Bridge team handles per day/week/month/year and do the math.
And, of course, that ignores the benefits associated with a more rapid fix-time for incidents which will enhance business service availability.


For pricing on OMi, please contact your local HP sales representative.


Can OMi run on the same server as Operations Manager?


No. You need to run the two products on different servers. OMi will run on its own Windows based platform and will be connected bi-directionally to a nominated OM server.


Do I need OMi to use the runbook automation capabilities of Operations Orchestration?


No. Operations Orchestration can use the events from Operations Manager as the trigger to launch flows. You do not need OMi too. Like OMi, OO leverages the power of OM and its agents. I strongly recommend you contact your HP sales rep to schedule a demo of Operations Manager and Operations Orchestration working together.


If everyone uses the same console, how will domain experts perform advanced troubleshooting?


The OMi console is designed for Operations Bridge personnel to view events, identify the causal event, and resolve the incident. Likely users will be Tier 1 operators and subject matter experts (SME) starting to troubleshoot problems and determine what to fix. The SMEs will then use their specialized tools to investigate the problems in more detail within their domain. For example, someone on the server team might see that a server is down and then use HP SIM (System Insight Manager) to identify that a fan has stopped working.
OMi includes the concept of “user roles” so that specific users can be provided with access to the events, infrastructure views and tools that are appropriate for their role. Domain experts could have user roles defined which include direct access to tools utilized for advanced troubleshooting.


Is there any special configuration I need to run OMi?


You need Operations Manager to consolidate events before feeding them to OMi. You can feed events from other tools (such as SiteScope for agentless monitoring) into Operations Manager to get better visibility of your enterprise by expanding the number of managed nodes. Operations Manager can also consolidate events from other domain managers such as Microsoft SCOM or IBM Tivoli.
You do need a recent version of Operations Manager – either OMW 8.10 with some specific patches or OMU 9.0. Existing Smart Plug-Ins will work with OMi but we’ve also been making some enhancements to provide tighter integration and to enable the Smart PlugIns for OMU to populate the topology maps automatically. So in general you need a recent OM version and later SPI versions are ‘better’.
Other than that, there is no special configuration.


Does OMi require ECS (event correlation services) to be built out?


No. As a general rule it’s a good idea to ‘refine’ the event stream that is processed by the OM server and passed to OMi. There is absolutely no point in passing lots of noise to OMi – stuff that we know is noise – so we would recommend making good use of all of the traditional event consolidation and filtering technologies in OM. Time and count based correlation on agents, de-duplication etc.
ECS – Event Correlation Services – can also be used to further refine the event stream as it arrives at an OMU server but it is not a requirement for OMi.


Any issues or challenges to be utilize OMi in duplicated IP addresses environment for company like MSP (managed service providers)?


OMi should work in duplicate IP address environments providing that appropriate DNS resolution and IP routing OR HTTP PROXY CHAINING is in place to enable outbound connections from the existing OM server to the managed nodes (agents) to work correctly. The support for dup-IP is something we included in the HTTP communications protocol which can be used with OM agents after version 8.x of the OM servers. There are a number of different ways that the network 'resolution' can be set up - including http proxies and NAT - and we cannot commit to testing every possible configuration. However, with an appropriate configuration OMi will work in these environments. In general, if you have a dup-IP environment working with your existing OM server then OMi should also work.


Does OMi take into consideration HA (high availability) configurations such that it can identify business degradation as opposed to an outage?


Yes. This is one advantage of having health calculation and event correlation which is dynamically driven by the discovery of the infrastructure. Consider a cluster running some Microsoft Exchange Resource Groups, or a number of VMware hosts with some virtual machines which participate in delivering a business service. In either case, if we have a hardware issue then we may move the ‘application’ (resource group or VM) to another host. This may happen automatically.
The Operations Manager Smart Plug-In (SPI) which is monitoring these resources – so the Exchange SPI (which is cluster aware) or the Virtualization Infrastructure SPI – will detect the movement of resources typically within 1 to 2 minutes. The SPI will update the discovery information in OM and this will be synchronized into OMi a short time later. OMi’s perspective of the topology of the infrastructure will change and the health and event correlation rules will adapt.
OMi will now ‘understand’ that the hardware events which arrived from the cluster or VM host do not impact the business service which is supported by the specific Exchange Resource Group or virtual machine.


 


For HP Operations Center, Peter Spielvogel.


Get the latest updates on our Twitter feed @HPITOps http://twitter.com/HPITOps


Join the HP OpenView & Operations Management group onLinkedIn.

Hawaii Pacific Health – Data Center Transformation (download success story)

CIO magazine posted an article about “Five Lessons for Consolidating Data Centers At Merger Time”. It follows a case study from Hawaii Pacific Health. I have posted on data center consolidation previously on this blog.
Squeeze It Management Costs Out With Consolidation Automation
Does Virtualization Consolidate Your It Operations Or Fragment Them?

Data Center Transformation can be challenging because of all the moving parts. There is the hardware consolidation, migrating servers to lower cost and likely lower power consumption. There is the capacity planning to determine how to use virtualization to squeeze out hardware procurement and maintenance costs. Finally there is the software consolidation, to provide a comprehensive view of the new IT infrastructure.


In some ways a data center consolidation (or new data center) is a chance to shake things up and introduce new technologies. Many customers use HP Operations Manager as a top-level console to consolidate events from multiple domain managers. While this approach works well and avoids any disruptive rip and replace, it does leave them with multiple domain managers and the associated maintenance and training costs of using them.


A data center consolidation on the other hand means you can design in the management software from the ground up using proven best practices. One set of instrumentation for physical and virtual servers, end-user alerts to ensure a good user experience, network and storage events integrated into the main console, and of course automated remediation to fix problems without human intervention. Finally, don’t forget new processes and metrics to make sure that everything runs smoothly and there are closed loop systems to continuously improve availability, performance, and cost.


You can download a success story on Hawaii Pacific Health that discusses the approach and business benefits in more detail. Please click on the "Attachment" link below.


For HP Operations Center, Peter Spielvogel.


Get the latest updates on our Twitter feed @HPITOps http://twitter.com/HPITOps


Join the HP OpenView & Operations Management group onLinkedIn.


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