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Junk Food also Causes Obesity in CMDBs, Studies Say

For a long time I've been looking for the better analogies for the concept of having standards of data quality around your CMDB.  One day during lunch, it hit me.  You have to think about populating your CMDB like you think about eating.  And it turns out, there are MANY equivalencies here.   For example, if you overeat, you're going to gain weight, so you can't move as fast, or do as much work.  When that happens, you lose value.  Ow. 

 

 

 

ITSM Architecture Missing a Fourth Dimension?

Yep, I found the problem.  There seems to be an intrinsic temporal dimension to ITSM implementations that I think needs to be called out.  A reference implementation of even a rudimentary ITSM "out of the box" will be different depending on what you start with and the order in which you implement your use cases. Meaning, if you implement Asset  then Change then Configuration Management, your resulting CMS will work differently than if you changed the order of just these three around!  ITSM math is apparently non-commutative!  I personally find this hilarious.

Parents say ITSM Old Enough to Get a Job

napoleon-dynamitecr.jpg

It's been a long hard road.   Your ITSM baby, once a gleam in your eye, has grown up.  At least a little.  You've fed and cared for it for years.  Changed its diaper too many times to count.  Woken up way too many times in the middle of the night.  Listened to its back-talk, its awkward falsettos.   Paid for lessons.  Watched its appetite grow.  Questioned its choice of a first date.  Maybe even bailed it out of jail by now.

 

Yes, ITSM is a lot like having children.  But everybody grows up.  Now it's time to get it's lazy butt off the couch and get to work. 

Discovery: There is no "Getting Started"

One of my favorite South Park episodes is Kenny the Virtuoso.  Kenny decides to take singing lessons.  The lessons go something like this:  "Ok, repeat after me.  La la la la".  Kenny goes "Hmmm hmm hmm hmm".  The instructions continue:  "good.  Now, sing along."  And starts in on Con Ti Partiro.  Amazingly, Kenny actually keeps up and sings it perfectly and on key.

 

We can't all be Discovery Kennys.  But we can certainly get a little help.  Ok, repeat after me...

ITSM - "IT Seemed Magic" at HP Discover 2011 - Sir Paul McCartney delivers stunning finale'

HP Discover 2011 was a time of many firsts.  I saw a Beatle for the first time.  We held the first joint UCMDB-SM integration  practitioner's forum.  We held the first live+audio CMS practitioner's forum.  Our first experiment with a bold, new hands-on lab format.  I met many of my customers in person for the first time.  And something in the water - or maybe it was the suckling pig at Dos Caminos that - well, it was a time of many firsts.  I'm almost - almost - sad to go home.

Discover Practitioner's Forums and Accelerate your Practice at HP Discover

Do you want to bring it like you mean it?  Empower yourself by plugging into the HP practitioner's forums.  In addition to the long-running CMS/CMDB practitioner's forum, we've recently rolled out several new practitioner forums for APM, NNM, and OMI.  We'll be running a kicked-up-a-notch version of these at the HP Discover conference in Las Vegas in June.

Consumers drive Providers, Providers are Transparent to Consumers: NOT a paradox!

Someone reading the COP model recently asked me that.  How can Consumers drive providers if providers are transparent to consumers?!  Dude, relax, it's ok.  it's about process, not opacity.

UCMDB and Service Manager Comnmunities Unite!

I had the privilege of meeting wtih almost forty customers face to face last week, during a series of Vivit user group meetings in Houston, Dallas, and Minneapolis.  It was fulfilling to me to listen to the customers and participate in the discussions.  I learned a lot, and I tried to pass on some helpful information.  Everybody brought it.  It was kind of like opening up a fresh can of the Practitioner's Forum. 

Even if you're going off the rails, you're still a Train: Leverage your Transformation's Momentum.

A data center transformation is essentially a train wreck in which the  train runs full speed into a transparent wall of time, pieces fly in all directions, and everyone on the Transformation team pick all the pieces out of the air, starting with those that will hit the ground soonest,  take them back to the track, reassemble them back into the running train, and once set off down the track, wonder if any stray pieces hit the ground and hope the occupants didn't notice.  The small miracle aside that it is actually possible to transform a live data center, is it possible to do it with little or no bloodshed to the business?  Do you want to find out?

It's Troux, CMDB and Enterprise Architecture Play Nice! Part 2, EA as a CMS Consumer

ITSM, CMDB, PPM, EA, CMS.  Not just SEO, but ITIL!  DCT!  Clooouuuuud……..

What does it all mean for the Enterprise Architect who spends a third of their time  gathering business context data?  A provider of even a small fraction of that amount would be, like, some kind of EA whisperer.  Really, what does business context mean to an enterprise architect?   What would be the value of CMS data to an EA?  What?

It's Troux, CMDB and Enterprise Architecture Play Nice! Part 1, EA as a CMS Provider

I see all kinds of IT environments, ranging from normal, to dungeonesque (full of tortured but alive people) to Taj-Mahalesque (pretty on the outside but full of death on the inside),  to, let's just say, the lights are on but nobody's home.  And every now and then, you find a data center who knows what Enterprise Architecture is.  It's Troux.    Which one are you?

Champions are a Natural Result of Community

In my last blog, we talked about best practices and set up this series of posts about creating and leveraging the power of Community.  Today, we talk about product champions:  community leaders and thinkers, superheroes to their organizations, writers and speakers at our conferences, the voice of the customer base and the product market to the ear of the vendor.  How does one go about building product champions?  And what good are they to us as a vendor, as a community?  NOT a rhetorical question, but one that deserves some TLC.  Just like our champions.

IT takes a Community to build best practices. Really.

Before one can have "best" practices, one must have "good" practices, or at least "good enough" practices.  This is not merely a trusism - you'd be amazed (or maybe not)  how best practices are expected to be generated, like code, on a timeframe.  I like to take Pragmantic Marketing's take on this:  NIHITO.  Nothing interesting happens in the office.  You have to get out sometimes.  Or you can make some stuff up.

Win Friends and Influence Processes as a Configuration Manager

Friends - and enemies - have a habit of showing up when you least expect them, right?  I have a theory based on this that can be applied to a CMS.  Are your CMS onboarding processes making friends, or enemies?  When will you know?

 

Don't Use a Discovery Tool as a Discovery Toolset. Don't.

I get asked all the time whether a particular discovery technology should be used in favor of another; whether one is better suited for a particular use case; if what we have can do a particular job.  It's all over the map.  Maybe because those asking don't have one.  A map I mean.  Here's one.  And a compass to use it by.  Hope it helps!

High Availability = Happy Holidays!

Have you ever been called away to work during a family holiday function?  No fun, is it?  "Sorry everybody, I have to go fix a problem."  Your daughter is in tears.  The wife gives you that look.  Grandma waves you out the door with an eye roll.  Your dinner is cold by the time your coat is on.   All thanks to that nice, big, change window when all the users are home with THEIR families, except maybe salesmen, a change went in that could not possibly affect anything else.  Yet here you are, and there is your cold Christmas dinner, waiting on the table.  It's times like these that makes one wonder why they got into this business.

Avoid CMDB, Discovery, and CMS Provider Conflict. Just Do It.

Are you suffering from provider conflict?  Is it painful for your IT professionals to resolve ownership issues?  Do all your Systems Architects dump the painful bits of that process on to Operations?  Does your vendor encourage this?  Most importantly, can you trust the data in your CMS right this minute?  I thought so.

Using CMS and Discovery in Data Center Transformations: Weird but True Stories

Stay with me for a minute.  I'm not talking about transforming your CMDB/CMS/Discovery/ITSM, I'm talking about USING a CMS or something like it to actually be The Tool for Data Center Transformations.  No way Jody!  What was all that talk last month about using the right tool for the right job?  Stay with me for a minute.

The new old blogs are here!

If you have started reading our blog after May 2010, then you've missed some of the good stuff. Thanks to a talented team of individuals, the old blogs are *finally* moved to our new Lithium platform. It wasn't easy. I think they had to use whips.
Labels: blog| ITSM| Jody Roberts

CMS Practitioner's Forum Passes Milestone 200th Session

The what? The who? You mean you've never heard of the UCMDB/DDM/CMS Practitioner's Forum? It's the best kept secret among CMDB practitioners. It's a round table. It's a knowledge-sharing, networking, idea-generating forum. It's a fast track to solving your problems, sometimes. We just did 200 of them. We may be doing something right.

HP's David Cannon receives itSMF Lifetime Achievement Award at itSMF Fusion 2010 conference

I'm tossing my usual drivel for something interesting. I attended the itSMF Fusion conference in Louisville Kentucky this week, along with Mr.. David Cannon. David was gracious enough to lend some of his time to help my team with the CMS best practices library. I knew we had something right when he said, "You got it right." Made my day. This week, David was awarded one of our industry's most prestigious honors, an itSMF Lifetime Achievement. Couldn't have happened to a better guy.

What Should Be a CI?

Life is tough. Deciding how to populate your CMS is tougher. As semantic and political battles rage among vendors, analysts, and the media, customers and practitioners are caught in the middle. Here is a bomb shelter that is small enough to carry on you but strong enough to protect you from the red glare buzzing overhead. It's constructed of high-fiber perspective.

CI = Asset?

In my presentation on the CMS value chain at Software Universe I tried to demystify some of the confusion around the CMS, and the CMDB in the CMS (yes you still need one in ITIL V3) . For example, how does the CMS relate to an "Asset"? As it turns out, there are multiple definitions and positioning. It's sometimes unpleasant.

HP Software Universe Unites CMS Community, Converges Market Requirements, Solves World Hunger

Well, two out of three isn't bad. But the CMS community was alive and well at Universe 2010! The presentations, round table sessions, and SIGs proved very fruitful for both HP and for our customers. Customers, partners, R&D, product management and product marketing got together for three productive and fun-filled days in Washington. The results are amazing.

Customer Builds Top-Performing Data Center using HP UCMDB and ITIL v3

Raiffeisen Rechenzentrum Sud consolidated 5 million CIs in UCMDB. By combining uCMDB and Business Availability Center technology, Raiffeisen Rechenzentrum Sud can now do impact analysis on a very high level, speeding resource gathering and deployment. A very nice story on how ROI was realized and documented by a customer using UCMDB and DDM on an ITIL v3 project. I knew we were doing something right.

CMS best practices library rev2 now available

HP customers and partners, come and get it! Served up hot for you, it's the new CMS best practices library revision 2, including the long-awaited CMS strategy guide.

New ITSM Blog Site is Up!

We've moved! Everyone who blogged or read the HP ITSM blog on the Telligent Platform, here is our new place, on a platform based on the Lithium technology. Learn about the new platform and blog away. The world is waiting! For now I will be yoru moderator and helper for anything you need. Thanks JR

Are You Dancing or Wrestling With Your ITSM Applications?

Did you ever notice how working with some software is like dancing, and other software is like wrestling?

 

How do you engage your CMDB, your Service Management applications? Do you dance or wrestle with them?

 

Do they anticipate your every need? Do they try to lead you to the next step, even if you're not sure? Or, must you force it onto the ground and win or lose based on strength vs. mass?

 

Must you use your CMDB in anger or is it inexpensive and easy to go query or integrate something? Does your CMDB keep your data "in jail"? Is everything always customization, or in the "next" release? These things add up!

 

It almost seems intentional sometimes. You can imagine a sumo developer, sitting up in his ivory tower, pondering his product's next feature. He's very good at building traps for unsuspecting or insufficiently expert users that don't measure up to his expectations of a user. He knows enough about the real world to be dangerous.

 

Smiling, he envisions the user face-down on the mat, begging for mercy. Yes, a newbie trap would be very good here, he reasons. Reaching for his keyboard, mentally he begins to wrestle with the user. The poor guy trying to implement it doesn't stand a chance:

  

 sumo_mismatch.jpg          sumo.jpg                        

 

Now of course we have to assume that our developer is very busy, that he can't overcome all the obstacles, that he's limited in his choices, that his budget is already set and he can't really listen to the users just now. And that bothersome product manager is a noob himself, so they're no help. Everything would just be ok if everybody did what I said, he thinks. That's it. My software will impose my will over the users. Make 'em do what I think they need to be doing.   Phooey on their use cases. Mine are better.

 

Now this is admittedly a cynical view. But tell me every one of you haven't used software that made you wonder if something like this wasn't just a tiiiiny bit true.  Tell me I'm wrong.

 

What if we were able to look at our Sumo developer's bag of tricks?    How would he make his product wrestle with his users? What would he do on the odd day he feels merciful and lets the user get something done easily and efficiently?  Even a developer has to give his people and his community a little respect.

 

Let's do some speculation.  C'mon, conjecture is fun! Besides, it's just the pejorative of "guessing". Which is, in reality, why a lot of software seems to be made to wrestle. The developer isn't evil, they just don't know. But let's not let that spoil our little developmental circus. On to the mind of our jovial but evil Sumo programmer:

 

Dancing

Wrestling

Having UIs for all configuration and deployment

Use text configuration a lot. Throw in some XML editing too. Make it all in different formats. For fun, change it every version.  Make configuration UI a low priority.  Make 'em wait for IDEs at least two or three releases.

Low TCO, easy to manage

Cost of integration is greater than the cost of the products

Positive OOBE (out-of-box experience)

Requires a consultant to take it out of the box

Users feel like the interface designer understood and faced the same needs and efficiencies and structures as they

Users wonder if the interface designer has talked to a customer

You have to do so few clicks to do something that the designer must have known this would be a frequently-used path and planned it that way

You have to do so many clicks to do something that you realize the designer never imagined this function would actually be used that way

User doesn't have to remember something between screens

User is required to remember complex names or strings between screens

Path(s) to do things are well-lit and clearly-defined

Path is not intuitive or is overly circuitous. Sometimes there just is no path

Any data entry error erases properly-entered data and forces you to re-enter or start over

Data entry error handling preserves all preservable user work

UI performs well all around

The more important the function, the worse it performs

Server and UI are stable, do not crash except under extraordinary circumstances

You have to do a lot of work and do things exactly right to minimize the number of crashes

Does not make you change your processes or organization to fit technology specifics

Requires obtrusive engineering or processes all it's own to be implemented in the organization

Natively understands ITSM processes and terms

Product feels like a generic platform fitted with ITSM restraints

Security is ubiquitous and transparent, mostly

Secure usage is painful because the Sumo developer wants to develop features, not security.  Security takes next-to-last place in priority ahead only of documentation.

Documentation was a priority. The developers wrote the documentation as part of their responsibility. It's not painful to read the doc.

Documentation was an afterthought. The developers were forced to "write" documentation or face consequences, so they jotted down a few bullets and handed it to the writers. The resulting lack of quality is painful and obvious.

UI is consistent. Menus, dialogue boxes, presentation, lists, right-clicks, etc. all seem to be the same thing

The evil developer bakes UI components based on his mood. Things are situated every which way to keep the users on their toes. For fun, switch around the "yes/no" choices and use double-negative choices ("Yes, I don't want to undo my 'yes' answer" - Huh?)

Diagnostics are easy. Logs and monitoring are easy to plug in and use

You better hope nothing goes wrong

If you do something bad, the product gracefully tries to tell you and help you.

It's easy for the user to crash the product or corrupt data.

The product doesn't allow a basic user to do any damage.

Even a basic user can create big problems for other users

Users smile when using the product

Users blood pressure increases when using the product

Product has expertise scalability - it's easy for both beginner and advanced users to use

New users cannot use the product. Only experienced users can use it. There are no new users of the product.

UI was designed under standard standards

UI was developed according to the developer's whimsy

Can install and manage it's own database, but allows external configuration as well

Either has full control or no control over database installation and configuration

 

I'm sure all of you have encountered at least of few these wrestling matches. But when you find a product you can dance with, it's beautiful. My question to you is, have any of you found a dancing CMDB? A dancing Service Management tool? The Grace Kelly of Asset Managers?

 

Our developers aren't evil. But I'm sure they occasionally entertain naughty thoughts. They're quite talented and for the most part, they're great dancers. If you're tired of wrestling with your ITSM solutions, drop in or give us a call. We'll dance with you.

 

Thanks!

Process Governance: The Dark Side of CMS

Ditch the suit, get your boots on, and bring a good flashlight!   Today we're journeying into the center of the ITSM Universe, Configuration Management.  What will we find?


 


Planning  or designing a CMS or CMDB?  Beware deceptively well-lit, short and simple paths to success.  They're illusions.  The actual path of achieving substantial ITSM ROI involves lots of crawling around in tight spaces and heavy organizational and technical lifting.  And there IS a wrong and a right way to do it.  There are all kinds of ways to fail, but only a few ways to succeed.  I'm thinking not "tour guide" but "expedition leader". ITSM is more Lechugilla than Carlsbad.


 


Like caving, CMS solution architecture can be, well, dark.  For example:  "should the _____ process interact with the _____ process through ____ or _____?"  Plug in your question of the day.  There's a million of 'em: Change Management,  Incident Management, the CMDB, directly.


 


Adding process and automation to an IT organization can be as challenging as any other organization in a business.  Possibly more so because that sort of thing IS our business and we don't like our business getting messed with.  But I've been covering that in my last three posts.   Today's hypothesis:


 


After a dark and strenuous trip, you arrive to find ITIL is hollow in the center.  The missing part is the data, how to handle the configuration data itself.  All the process and governance around the data and information about the data, for example, how accurate or timely the data is.  You have to think about what to fill this gap with and the operational ebb and flow of the data.   From the beginning.  Ultimately, it's as much about the data as the process.  But ITIL is forthemostpart dark on this, and it's also least-filled-in part all around.  The documentation, the stakeholders, the technicians, the consultants don't focus on it.  The process and governance work is left to evolve organically or for you, the accountable party, to figure out.  While you must ultimately craft your own processes, it's still not nice of the consultants to leave anything undocumented, especially any custom work like integration or model extensions, etc.  But that's not what I'm writing about.  Back to the gap. 


 


The gap is, the discipline of constantly measuring all the onboarding, as well as the operational, activities related to the data against the desired state.  Not just a successful installation and demonstration, and not even just usage and operation, but successful operation, where the CMDB measurably reduced risk and cost and improved reliability of the configuration data provided to IT's consumers.    And I presuppose a well-defined use case and an achievable, understandable, quantifiable ROI here.  If the data is sloppy going in, your ROI suffers an you see sluggish or no ROI up in the business KPIs.


 


I'm not talking about Asset Management or SACM!  These processes  do things like, call for specific ownership of certain CI types, and call to be the specific provider of certain CI types.  This is not what I'm talking about!  I'm talking about the layer that sits between ALL the processes and the CMS, the governance part, that which is responsible for evaluating the data and its fitness for consumption.


 


If CMDB is about plumbing, CMS is about water quality.  


 


So you have a working  CMDB, a building full of experts ready to federate, a bag full of use cases, now what?  Oh yeah, maybe you already did some discovery.  You'll probably have to undo some of that.  Rewind for a minute.


 


As you go through the presales demo, your Proof of Concept, your testing and lab work, and finally, your move to production, can you answer the following questions:



  • Who is the intended consumer of the data?  (Hint:  You better have at least one)

  • Who owns each CI and attribute?  (Hint:  Someone needs to)

  • What provider conflicts exist?  For example, between the discovery and the asset or service or network management systems? (Hint:  There shouldn't be conflicts in the finished CMS.  Not a misprint.)

  • Who does the business see as accountable for this configuration data?  (Hint:  not the Alpha Geek's spreadsheet)

  • Who decides what data is provided to what consumer?  (Hint:  It shouldn't be the consumer or the provider.  No really, not a misprint.)


 


The answers reveal your config data onboarding processes, or lack thereof.


 


Here is the dark space in the center of ITIL:  You need a good governance model to build the processes around onboarding and managing configuration data, which, when followed, will result in the highest quality data possible provided to the consumer in the most efficient and secure manner possible.   "Data Stewardship" is a good way of thinking about it, here is a gentleman who understands.


 


By accounting for the authoritative nature of the data, and the entitlement of the consumer, one can construct such a model which can guide those creating processes for using a CMS, during and after CMDB and CMS implementation.


 


Such a model must minimally account for three things:  the consumer, the provider, and the owner.  The model must provide a few basic tenets which reach into every aspect of how configuration data is handled by the CMS.  For example, how provider "conflict" is handled, how ownership of data is established, and why consumers must be understood vs. merely serviced.  This is the missing gap in the center of ITIL.  I hope. 


 


I and a bunch of my friends have developed such a model, and it happens to be called the Consumer/Owner/Provider Model, or just the COP model for short.  In my next posts, I'll be introducing some of the major tenets of the COP model and discussing each one in  more detail.  Perhaps you think of some of these tenets in other ways or using other language, but I want to see how well this relates to you. 


 


I hope I've whetted your appetite and that you're full of questions.  Feel free to ask them here or comment with a reply.  Thanks!


 

How Long Should a CMDB / CMS Take to Build? Part 3: Process Engineering

This is the third post in the "How Long Should a CMDB/CMS Take to Build" series.


 


Today's tagline: YOU must make the final journey to the right process.  No one else, not even a cherished trusted vendor or analyst, can make it for you.  But they can act as a spiritual advisor.


 


ITIL Process engineering is the second most important part of the deployment, the most difficult to get right except for people and cultural change.  The only reason process engineering is slightly easier than these is because you at least have better measurement tools.


 


And I'm talking about ITIL processes here, for which additional complexities apply.


 


There aren't many vacant lots left in downtown ITIL.  I'm talking about process RE-engineering as well, because almost none of you are building a data center from scratch.  You already have some kind of processes, bethem manual or dysfunctional.  Part of the process-building involves assimilation and demolition of parts of the earlier generation processes.


 


So what do you start with:  Needs, goals, plans, budget, vendors, tools?  Turns out it's not so straightforward.


 


It's a paradox.  You can't easily build your processes without a tool in mind or you will not be able to find a tool that does everything you want.  Don't believe me?  Go ahead, try, you'll spend a ton of money on column fodder and end up picking the vendor that can just fill in the most columns - a disappointing and possibly unwise strategy.


 


However, you don't want your processes to be tool-driven because you will end up locking out the most important KPIs which are fulfilling your use cases exactly. 


 


So, do I pick a vendor first, or define my requirements first?  My answer:  it's an iterative process, there is no prescriptive approach that ensures success - you must have a good IDEA of your processes, then court a few vendors, then get some preliminary input to refine your idea of what config management should be, ask a few more questions, and repeat until you have a good foundation that will fulfill your use cases and is supportable by a solution you can buy and build.


 


The CMDB is a tool, maybe even a platform.  The CMS is a deployed operational solution.  You must still operate it with your own processes and people.  Good luck with ITIL.  You'll need more than that.  But I digress.


 


If you expect your vendor to supply all the processes because the tool won't work without them - you're in trouble.  You must still understand all your processes to the point where YOU are doing the service transitions and operations.  Most  vendors can't and won't care as much about how well your processes work, and at best will deliver incomplete, high-level, or overly-generic  processes, the same cartoon version of IT that ITIL already provides.


 


 As a vendor you have to work really hard to create and deliver a good process layer of best practices around your CMS and CMDB.  And while I've tried hard (that is one of my projects at HP), I cannot fool myself that we have gotten everything right, in fact or in principle.  Experience and the rigorous discipline of journal-keeping,  analysis, and continual improvement are our only lights into the future of process.  Don't let anyone else sell you otherwise.


 


Some final recommendations:



  • Get yourself some wild, angry beekeepers.  They'll keep your you, as well as your vendor, honest, and help you identify the needed, the unneeded, and the just plain stupid.

  • Come to recognize the smell of crap factoids.  Analysts and vendors, like Alpha Geeks, CIOs, bloggers, and help desk technicians, are not immune to hubris. 

  • Not all IT organizations need to "mature" all of their processes to the maximum "maturity".  Avoid unnecessary or self-fulfilling scaffolding, even if it's your vendor's favorite.  Even though ITIL says you should be doing something, you must decide for yourself whether you actually should be doing that thing.  And  it's not always easy to determine.  Read.  Study.  Know not just IT but YOUR IT.  In the vicious world of ITIL, knowledge isn't just power, it's survival.

  • Same thing I tell all the school kids I teach astronomy to: Keep asking questions.

  • Configuration management, like education, is not about filling a bucket, it's about lighting a fire.   Think, motivated, self-policing, continual service improvement.  Incent your people to seek out improvement and they will do so, to your benefit.  Too expensive?  Don't expect much help.

  • If you don't understand something but should, go ahead and ask the question.  But remember the risk.  And think about who you should ask first.


 


I hope this post touches a nerve, or gets through to someone, or even angers someone enough to post a reply.  I'd really like to hear what you think.  Thanks for your time.

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About the Author(s)
  • HP IT Service Management Product Marketing team manager. I am also responsible for our end-to-end Change, Configuration, and Release Management (CCRM) solution. My background is engineering and computer science in the networking and telecom worlds. As they used to say in Telcom, "the network is the business" (hence huge focus on service management). I always enjoyed working with customers and on the business side of things, so here I am in ITSM marketing.
  • David has led a career in Enterprise Software for over 20 years and has brought to market numerous successful IT management products and innovations.
  • Gil Tzadikevitch HP Software R&D Service Anywhere
  • This account is for guest bloggers. The blog post will identify the blogger.
  • Jacques Conand is the Director of ITSM Product Line, having responsibility for the product roadmap of several products such as HP Service Manager, HP Asset Manager, HP Universal CMDB, HP Universal Discovery and the new HP Service Anywhere product. Jacques is also chairman of the ITSM Customer Advisory Board, ensuring the close linkage with HP's largest customers.
  • Jody Roberts is a researcher, author, and customer advocate in the Product Foundation Services (PFS) group in HP Software. Jody has worked with the UCMDB product line since 2004, and currently takes care of the top 100 HP Software customers, the CMS Best Practices library, and has hosted a weekly CMDB Practitioner's Forum since 2006.
  • Software technical product manager for HP Strategic Analytics--Executive Scorecard (XS) and Financial Planning & Analysis (FPA). Generate technologically sophisticated IT Performance Analytics use cases in collaboration with fellow HP product managers and design partners. Liaison for XS & FPA product managers, customers, and development team. Draw upon experience and industry pulse to influence the definition of product strategy and roadmap. Primary implementer of POCs for key elements of the company's offering including executive scorecard, financial planning and analysis, and process analytics..
  • Mary is a member of HP’s ITSM product marketing team and is responsible for HP Service Anywhere. She has 20+ years of product marketing, product management, and channel/alliances experience. Mary joined HP in 2010 from an early-stage SaaS company providing hosted messaging and mobility services. She also has product management experience in the ITSM industry. Mary has a BS in Computer Science and a MBA in Marketing. Follow: @MaryR_Colorado
  • Michael Pott is a Product Marketing Manager for HP ITSM Solutions. Responsibilities include out-bound marketing and sales enablement. Michael joined HP in 1989 and has held various positions in HP Software since 1996. In product marketing and product management Michael worked on different areas of the IT management software market, such as market analysis, sales content development and business planning for a broad range of products such as HP Operations Manager and HP Universal CMDB.
  • Ming is Product Manager for HP ITSM Solutions
  • Oded is the Chief Functional Architect for the HP Service and Portfolio Management products, which include Service Manager, Service Anywhere, Universal CMDB & Discovery, Asset Manager, Project and Portfolio Manager.
  • Olivier is Product Line Manager for the HP Configuration Management System (CMS) which is comprised of UCMDB, UCMDB Configuration Manager, the UCMDB Browser, and Universal Discovery.
  • I am Senior Product Manager for Service Manager. I have been manning the post for 10 years and working in various technical roles with the product since 1996. I love SM, our ecosystem, and our customers and I am committed to do my best to keep you appraised of what is going on. I will even try to keep you entertained as I do so. Oh and BTW... I not only express my creativity in writing but I am a fairly accomplished oil painter.
  • WW Sr Product Marketing Manager for HP ITPS VP of Apps & HP Load Runner
  • Vesna is the senior product marketing manager at HP Software. She has been with HP for 13 years in R&D, product management and product marketing. At HP she is responsible for go to market and enablement of the HP IT Performance Suite products.
  • A 25+ year veteran of HP, Yvonne is currently a Senior Product Manager of HP ITSM software including HP Service Anywhere and HP Service Manager. Over the years, Yvonne has had factory and field roles in several different HP businesses, including HP Software, HP Enterprise Services, HP Support, and HP Imaging and Printing Group. Yvonne has been masters certified in ITIL for over 10 years and was co-author of the original HP IT Service Management (ITSM) Reference Model and Primers.
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