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Pedal to the metal - HP widens its leadership gap in ITIL v3 certification


HP Service Manager has taken a big leap forward in its ITIL v3 leadership position.  HP Service Manager 7.1x is now certified by OGC (the creators of ITIL) at the Gold Level in nine ITIL v3 processes, three times the lead of the next closest vendor’s product.   


 


The Gold Level certification is hard to achieve (see my previous blog entry to get more detail on that).  It means that multiple customers provided documented proof to the auditors that they are using HP Service Manager to automate their ITIL v3 processes. 


 


Here is a list of the ITIL processes implemented within HP Service Manager that have been certified at the Gold Level:


 


1. Incident Management


2. Problem Management


3. Change Management


4. Service Asset & Configuration Management


5. Service Catalog Management


6. Request Fulfillment


7. Service Level Management


8. Knowledge Management


9. Service Portfolio Management


 


Customers who understand the value of fully embedded ITIL v3 best practices have it easier than ever before.  Now that HP Service Manager is the clear leader on OGC's certification scorecard it will certainly help many of these customers determine, without a doubt, that HP Service Manager is their best choice to help run IT like a business.


 


 



 

Process Governance: The Dark Side of CMS

Ditch the suit, get your boots on, and bring a good flashlight!   Today we're journeying into the center of the ITSM Universe, Configuration Management.  What will we find?


 


Planning  or designing a CMS or CMDB?  Beware deceptively well-lit, short and simple paths to success.  They're illusions.  The actual path of achieving substantial ITSM ROI involves lots of crawling around in tight spaces and heavy organizational and technical lifting.  And there IS a wrong and a right way to do it.  There are all kinds of ways to fail, but only a few ways to succeed.  I'm thinking not "tour guide" but "expedition leader". ITSM is more Lechugilla than Carlsbad.


 


Like caving, CMS solution architecture can be, well, dark.  For example:  "should the _____ process interact with the _____ process through ____ or _____?"  Plug in your question of the day.  There's a million of 'em: Change Management,  Incident Management, the CMDB, directly.


 


Adding process and automation to an IT organization can be as challenging as any other organization in a business.  Possibly more so because that sort of thing IS our business and we don't like our business getting messed with.  But I've been covering that in my last three posts.   Today's hypothesis:


 


After a dark and strenuous trip, you arrive to find ITIL is hollow in the center.  The missing part is the data, how to handle the configuration data itself.  All the process and governance around the data and information about the data, for example, how accurate or timely the data is.  You have to think about what to fill this gap with and the operational ebb and flow of the data.   From the beginning.  Ultimately, it's as much about the data as the process.  But ITIL is forthemostpart dark on this, and it's also least-filled-in part all around.  The documentation, the stakeholders, the technicians, the consultants don't focus on it.  The process and governance work is left to evolve organically or for you, the accountable party, to figure out.  While you must ultimately craft your own processes, it's still not nice of the consultants to leave anything undocumented, especially any custom work like integration or model extensions, etc.  But that's not what I'm writing about.  Back to the gap. 


 


The gap is, the discipline of constantly measuring all the onboarding, as well as the operational, activities related to the data against the desired state.  Not just a successful installation and demonstration, and not even just usage and operation, but successful operation, where the CMDB measurably reduced risk and cost and improved reliability of the configuration data provided to IT's consumers.    And I presuppose a well-defined use case and an achievable, understandable, quantifiable ROI here.  If the data is sloppy going in, your ROI suffers an you see sluggish or no ROI up in the business KPIs.


 


I'm not talking about Asset Management or SACM!  These processes  do things like, call for specific ownership of certain CI types, and call to be the specific provider of certain CI types.  This is not what I'm talking about!  I'm talking about the layer that sits between ALL the processes and the CMS, the governance part, that which is responsible for evaluating the data and its fitness for consumption.


 


If CMDB is about plumbing, CMS is about water quality.  


 


So you have a working  CMDB, a building full of experts ready to federate, a bag full of use cases, now what?  Oh yeah, maybe you already did some discovery.  You'll probably have to undo some of that.  Rewind for a minute.


 


As you go through the presales demo, your Proof of Concept, your testing and lab work, and finally, your move to production, can you answer the following questions:



  • Who is the intended consumer of the data?  (Hint:  You better have at least one)

  • Who owns each CI and attribute?  (Hint:  Someone needs to)

  • What provider conflicts exist?  For example, between the discovery and the asset or service or network management systems? (Hint:  There shouldn't be conflicts in the finished CMS.  Not a misprint.)

  • Who does the business see as accountable for this configuration data?  (Hint:  not the Alpha Geek's spreadsheet)

  • Who decides what data is provided to what consumer?  (Hint:  It shouldn't be the consumer or the provider.  No really, not a misprint.)


 


The answers reveal your config data onboarding processes, or lack thereof.


 


Here is the dark space in the center of ITIL:  You need a good governance model to build the processes around onboarding and managing configuration data, which, when followed, will result in the highest quality data possible provided to the consumer in the most efficient and secure manner possible.   "Data Stewardship" is a good way of thinking about it, here is a gentleman who understands.


 


By accounting for the authoritative nature of the data, and the entitlement of the consumer, one can construct such a model which can guide those creating processes for using a CMS, during and after CMDB and CMS implementation.


 


Such a model must minimally account for three things:  the consumer, the provider, and the owner.  The model must provide a few basic tenets which reach into every aspect of how configuration data is handled by the CMS.  For example, how provider "conflict" is handled, how ownership of data is established, and why consumers must be understood vs. merely serviced.  This is the missing gap in the center of ITIL.  I hope. 


 


I and a bunch of my friends have developed such a model, and it happens to be called the Consumer/Owner/Provider Model, or just the COP model for short.  In my next posts, I'll be introducing some of the major tenets of the COP model and discussing each one in  more detail.  Perhaps you think of some of these tenets in other ways or using other language, but I want to see how well this relates to you. 


 


I hope I've whetted your appetite and that you're full of questions.  Feel free to ask them here or comment with a reply.  Thanks!


 

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About the Author(s)
  • HP IT Service Management Product Marketing team manager. I am also responsible for our end-to-end Change, Configuration, and Release Management (CCRM) solution. My background is engineering and computer science in the networking and telecom worlds. As they used to say in Telcom, "the network is the business" (hence huge focus on service management). I always enjoyed working with customers and on the business side of things, so here I am in ITSM marketing.
  • David has led a career in Enterprise Software for over 20 years and has brought to market numerous successful IT management products and innovations.
  • I am the PM of UCMDB and CM. I have a lot of background in configuration management, discovery, integrations, and delivery. I have been involved with the products for 12 years in R&D and product management.
  • Gil Tzadikevitch HP Software R&D Service Anywhere
  • This account is for guest bloggers. The blog post will identify the blogger.
  • Jacques Conand is the Director of ITSM Product Line, having responsibility for the product roadmap of several products such as HP Service Manager, HP Asset Manager, HP Universal CMDB, HP Universal Discovery and the new HP Service Anywhere product. Jacques is also chairman of the ITSM Customer Advisory Board, ensuring the close linkage with HP's largest customers.
  • Jody Roberts is a researcher, author, and customer advocate in the Product Foundation Services (PFS) group in HP Software. Jody has worked with the UCMDB product line since 2004, and currently takes care of the top 100 HP Software customers, the CMS Best Practices library, and has hosted a weekly CMDB Practitioner's Forum since 2006.
  • Mary is a member of HP’s ITSM product marketing team and is responsible for HP Service Anywhere. She has 20+ years of product marketing, product management, and channel/alliances experience. Mary joined HP in 2010 from an early-stage SaaS company providing hosted messaging and mobility services. She also has product management experience in the ITSM industry. Mary has a BS in Computer Science and a MBA in Marketing. Follow: @MaryRasmussen_
  • Michael Pott is a Product Marketing Manager for HP ITSM Solutions. Responsibilities include out-bound marketing and sales enablement. Michael joined HP in 1989 and has held various positions in HP Software since 1996. In product marketing and product management Michael worked on different areas of the IT management software market, such as market analysis, sales content development and business planning for a broad range of products such as HP Operations Manager and HP Universal CMDB.
  • Ming is Product Manager for HP ITSM Solutions
  • Nimish Shelat is currently focused on Datacenter Automation and IT Process Automation solutions. Shelat strives to help customers, traditional IT and Cloud based IT, transform to Service Centric model. The scope of these solutions spans across server, database and middleware infrastructure. The solutions are optimized for tasks like provisioning, patching, compliance, remediation and processes like Self-healing Incidence Remediation and Rapid Service Fulfilment, Change Management and Disaster Recovery. Shelat has 21 years of experience in IT, 18 of these have been at HP spanning across networking, printing , storage and enterprise software businesses. Prior to his current role as a World-Wide Product Marketing Manager, Shelat has held positions as Software Sales Specialist, Product Manager, Business Strategist, Project Manager and Programmer Analyst. Shelat has a B.S in Computer Science. He has earned his MBA from University of California, Davis with a focus on Marketing and Finance.
  • Oded is the Chief Functional Architect for the HP Service and Portfolio Management products, which include Service Manager, Service Anywhere, Universal CMDB & Discovery, Asset Manager, Project and Portfolio Manager.
  • Olivier is Product Line Manager for the HP Configuration Management System (CMS) which is comprised of UCMDB, UCMDB Configuration Manager, the UCMDB Browser, and Universal Discovery.
  • I am Senior Product Manager for Service Manager. I have been manning the post for 10 years and working in various technical roles with the product since 1996. I love SM, our ecosystem, and our customers and I am committed to do my best to keep you appraised of what is going on. I will even try to keep you entertained as I do so. Oh and BTW... I not only express my creativity in writing but I am a fairly accomplished oil painter.
  • WW Sr Product Marketing Manager for HP ITPS VP of Apps & HP Load Runner
  • Vesna is the senior product marketing manager at HP Software. She has been with HP for 13 years in R&D, product management and product marketing. At HP she is responsible for go to market and enablement of the HP IT Performance Suite products.
  • A 25+ year veteran of HP, Yvonne is currently a Senior Product Manager of HP ITSM software including HP Service Anywhere and HP Service Manager. Over the years, Yvonne has had factory and field roles in several different HP businesses, including HP Software, HP Enterprise Services, HP Support, and HP Imaging and Printing Group. Yvonne has been masters certified in ITIL for over 10 years and was co-author of the original HP IT Service Management (ITSM) Reference Model and Primers.
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