Parents say ITSM Old Enough to Get a Job

Just how does one get an adolescent ITSM not merely breathing, but performing?   Many of us are at that "awkward teenager" stage with our ITSM.  Perhaps a few success stories, but not yet delivered on the vision that got the funding.

 

Yes, ITSM is a LOT like having children.    And if you want to raise a future president, you have to send 'em to a good school.  Pay for the good music lessons.  Show some tough love.  Impart a sense of discipline, don't simply dispense it.   You may not think of the phrase "process engineering" in the same way for some time. 

 

So we can apply many useful analogies from raising our children to raising our ITSM.  For example:

 

  • Children don't arrive out of the box, ready to be a productive member of society.  Neither does ITSM,   "Instant-on" is a world-class prep school, not a time machine.  It is the journey that prepares one for the destination.  Cheating circumvents the purpose.  See my blog "You can't buy a CMS from HP (Or anyone else)"
  • Children must get a good education.  Raw talent is not enough.  Best-in-class talent warrants best-in-class instruction and measurement.
  • Outcomes before income.  You want your ITSM kid to HAVE a good job, it has to DO a good job.
  • Good habits develop out of good process discipline.  At some point your ITSM child should brush it's teeth without being told.  (The same measurements that produce a successful ITSM implementation should be the same measurements used operationally.  See, I'm not so far afield after all!)
  • Patience is a must, but stand firm on the real boundaries.  Add rubber bumpers and/or training wheels for a while.

 

These allegories, while certainly tongue-in-cheek, compellingly demand a set of resources which will properly rear your ITSM child.  As an IT parent/leader, where can you find such resources?  Welcome to HP's school of parenting the gifted.

 

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Comments
Honored Contributor | ‎10-05-2011 11:28 PM

Nice one Jody!

The only problem is that sometimes the ITSM child is like an "ugly duckling" which will never become a swan :)

Jody Roberts | ‎10-06-2011 11:23 AM

lol Vadim that's funny!  Sometimes it's only a mother's love that keeps her from strangling the thing at birth :-)  But hey, physical appearance is only one variable for success.  Take me for example.  I'm a large, hairy, unattractive man.  But behind the keyboard....I feel free.  Beauty is as beauty does.  If it doesn't, kill it and make another one.  I'm reminded of one of Fred Brooks' principles:  Plan to Throw One Away.

Thanks for the feedback!

JR

 

 

Honored Contributor | ‎10-06-2011 11:14 PM

Not arguing with you Jody but as follow up to your example:

After someone hairy and unattractive which feels free at keyboard, stands up from that keyboard and goes to real life, he is still large, hairy and unattractive for the rest community.

So while on the paper ITSM may look very attractive and awesome to the customer, after it goes further to their real life you can hear the standard words "hey, this is something other then on paper, we don't want  this thing".

 

Still you do understand that I am mostly joking and again thank you for your awesome article!

 

Best Regards

Vadim

chuck_darst | ‎10-07-2011 11:58 AM

Jody for President (thinking of Napoleon Dynamite)

Jody Roberts | ‎10-08-2011 01:29 PM

Yeah I got skills

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About the Author
Jody Roberts is a researcher, author, and customer advocate in the Product Foundation Services (PFS) group in HP Software. Jody has worked ...
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