Maturity and Transforming Service Management

Reinventing Service Management for the new style of IT

 

For years now, IT departments have dealt with escalating demand for services in the face of steadily shrinking budgets—yet at the same time they are increasingly pressured to demonstrate their relevance to the lines of business, to align technical capabilities with new delivery models, and to move beyond basic firefighting and request handling.

 

If IT organizations cannot find ways to improve their strategic value in today’s new era of decentralized IT, they risk losing relevance. And to improve strategic value, the service desk team needs to evaluate their maturity.

 

I have written a few blogs over the past couple of months on various dimensions of the new style of IT. I have looked at the benefits of increased simplicity, agility, and speed – combined with the opportunity to Brighttalk 15Aug.jpgreduce IT costs. The new style of IT is based on leveraging mobile, big data, social, security and cloud capabilities. For an overview, please watch a recent web event where we discussed:

  • Managing multiple suppliers
  • New approaches for management knowledge
  • Changing user expectations 

The intersection of the knowledge and user parts of this can be thought of as Social Insight.

 

A foundational element of to staying relevant in the face of changing expectations and evolving technologies is ITSM Maturity. I submit that starting in approximately 2008, coinciding with the worldwide economic contraction, ITSM maturity took a back seat to other cost-driven concerns.

 

Since then, there have been some positive dimensions to this such as an increased focus on productivity and simplicity as well as a more pragmatic approach to process best practices including ITIL. I am not sure when Gartner started their *IT Operations Management (ITOM) assessments, but for the past few years hundreds of users have self-assessed themselves at a maturity of 2.3 on a 5 point scale.

 

The issue is that IT is at risk of being left behind or being left with an overall patchwork of IT process cloud.jpganarchy. This occurs as different parts of an organization do their own thing – particularly in the face of increased options on how services are sourced or delivered.

 

For more on managing multiple suppliers, I recommend reading “How many suppliers does your IT organization use”. As Lines of Business (LoB’s) exert more influence on IT strategy and investments, IT must become more service aware.

 

This doesn’t mean that an IT organization at a level 2 needs to become a level 5 overnight (or maybe ever), but the service desk needs to consider incremental capabilities that are needed to support their business or organizations needs over the medium term.

 

Chuck

 

search.jpgP.S. on the overall reinventing service management for the new style of IT topic, we had a Brighttalk webinar last week on knowledge management use cases and empowering users. Check out the recording!

 

 

 

*ITScore Overview for Infrastructure and Operations

Published: 10 May 2013 ID:G00250748

Levels 1: Awareness, 2: Committed, 3: Proactive, 4: Service-Aligned, and 5: Business Partner

Comments
Michael Pott (michael_pott) | ‎10-15-2013 04:54 AM

Chuck, I enjoyed reading your blog post. A couple of things really caught my attention. Two of them were "maturity" (ok, that's the title of your post anyway) and "managing multiple suppliers". I think these two go nicely together and illustrate why to improve maturity.

With the cloud, the multiple supplier situation is a reality in most if not all IT organizations. As a result, many IT organizations have increasing challenges due to the lack of standardized supplier on-boarding procedures, weak process alignment, and missing policies (e.g. for service level management) that span across multiple vendors to name a few only.

Increasing IT's maturity can be a relief here. In the example of multi-supplier integration it enables IT to harmonize different operating models across different parts of the organization and external suppliers.

For sure this requires a transformation, because - according to Gartner - maturity is about people, processes, technology and business management. SIAM (Service Integration and Management) is an HP Enterprise solution that can attend the journey towards multi-supplier integration and a higher level of maturity.

Makes sense? What do other readers think?

MaryR | ‎10-15-2013 11:56 PM

Chuck -  Nice post!  I'm curious though - if the average organization is at 2.3, what are the main "show stoppers" that keep them from advancing to level 3?  any ideas? Mary

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About the Author
HP IT Service Management Product Marketing team manager. I am also responsible for our end-to-end Change, Configuration, and Release Managem...


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