OpenSSL Vulnerability--The Movie--Part II

There is a new Open SSL vulnerability CVE-2014-0195 filter dropping this week and the vulnerability is not going to be pretty. This seems to be part II of the Heartbleed series and I think all of enterprise security is familiar with how that movie played out. But let me cut to the chase, HP TippingPoint customers are protected--thanks to our HP TippingPoint protection lifecycle--and that is good news.

 

Now for a bit of the bad news, this vulnerability was found in the OpenSSL library and created by the same tp protection lifecycle.pngprogrammer as Heartbleed. While these two vulnerabilities seem to be in the same family, this one is a more evil version. This vulnerability manifests differently. It gives the ability for the attacker to have remote code execution on the victim machine, meaning the exploited computer or access point can be controlled and manipulated to do whatever the hacker wants!  This is serious, embarrassing and severe.

 

But this movie has a happy ending, where the good guys win. One of our regular HPSR Zero Day Initiative contributors found the vulnerability and alerted the ZDI who –in turn – alerted us. The HP TippingPoint DVLabs team sprang into action ensuring our customers are covered and their networks are secure. Our weekly Digital Vaccine package was released April 23rd, 2014 with the virtual patch that will stop the attack. That’s 43 days of coverage before OpenSSL group released a patch.

 

How’s that for showing that every second matters to HP in protecting our customers.

 

Let’s hope this does not turn into a trilogy or worse. Stay tuned into our blog for updates.

 

Read more from our HPSR team here.

 

Labels: DVLabs| TippingPoint
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