Thinking about Private Cloud? Don’t build a new compute infrastructure on outdated storage design

Author: Brad Parks, Converged Infrastructure strategist for HP Storage.

 

When you look at your storage infrastructure, what do you see? Do you see an infrastructure design that might be old enough to go to college? Traditional storage infrastructure was designed for predictable, physical workloads.  That is a sharp contrast to a prediction that 80 percent of x86 application workloads will be virtualized by 2016.

 

Imagine trying to build a cloud environment on a storage architecture that has its roots in a 20 year old design. The image will resemble a construction crew building a modern skyscraper on top of a cabin in the woods. The foundation for that cabin was intended for a cabin, not a skyscraper. Cloud environments require more.

 

These legacy designs may have added features over the years, but foundational gaps are revealing themselves.  Look at today’s data center – virtualization, cloud and an explosion of big data content – all unpredictable workloads that require a different approach.

 

Cloud infrastructure performs best when deployed on a modern storage infrastructure designed for the unique demands of IT as a Service. When you begin from scratch, you design-in features in a fundamentally different way than if you are bolting on to an existing framework. At HP, we believe Cloud environments require:

 

  • Dynamic multi-tenancy to deal with diverse unpredictable workloads
  • Efficient use of resources to align cost with revenue or chargeback
  • Management automation to speed service delivery

At the Pathways to Cloud Roadshow 2012 sponsored by HP and Intel®, you will learn from the experts how HP can help your organization establish the right foundation for cloud workloads. Or, if you already have moved to IT-as-a-Service, they will show you how to best evolve your current system to maximize ROI.

 

During the “Storage Requirements for Private Cloud” presentation on day 2 of the roadshow, participants will discover how HP Converged Storage will provide your enterprise with new levels of efficiency and agility with a design that features:

 

  • Converged management and orchestration
  • Scale-out storage software and federation
  • Standard x86-based platform leverage

This presentation is a practical discussion about the best ways to store, optimize, manage and protect the information your enterprise depends on.

 

Enterprises evolve at different speeds.  If you are just now amplifying your virtualization effort or scoping a hybrid cloud project any gains you make in storage agility and efficiency will serve you well.  HP and our channel partners offer a range of service engagement options to help you blueprint your path to cloud nirvana and architect a transition plan to get you there.

 

HP Pathways to Cloud roadshow is touring the U.S. and Canada from March 6- May 1. The roadshow will help you explore and understand the key elements involved on the path to cloud.  The 15-city roadshow begins in Houston, and continues with stops in Seattle, Boston, Orange County, Atlanta, Chicago, and San Francisco.

 

Register for a roadshow event near you or get more information.

 

Comments
Nadhan | ‎03-12-2012 01:17 PM

Brad, Thanks for highlighting a key "Don't" for the Private Cloud.  Here are a few more Don'ts for the Private Cloud from my perspective: http://bit.ly/ztaF32

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