History Repeats: From Card Catalogs to Public Cloud Service Catalogs

In 1456, Johannes Gutenberg offered his Bible, the first created using a movable type printing press. Pope Pius II presumably needed only to lay it on a table. Twenty years later William Caxton began using a Gutenberg printing press in England, producing more works. For an avid reader of the time, a shelf might now be required. As the years passed, shelves became bookcases, bookcases became libraries, and libraries required card catalogs, which evolved to online databases to find the books, in the libraries, in a bookcase, on a shelf. Also in this time, books became big business, book critics and clubs evolved, and bestseller lists were created.

 

Gutenberg_Bible.jpg

 

Today, we see history repeat. Where card catalogs (and their online cousins) evolved to track books, and critics and clubs evolved to guide our choices, the same has begun to occur in Cloud services. Over the past several years as the number of ‘as-a-Service’ solutions has grown, so has the need for a Cloud service catalog to assist enterprises manage their end-users’ adoption of public Cloud services. Centralizing the access to external services in a common catalog, the new HP Public Cloud Service Catalog (beta) enables IT organizations to certify solutions based on price, quality, and compliance with enterprise policies and standards and then effectively manage the service portfolio based on cost, quality of service and user feedback.

As the latest Cloud innovation from HP, the HP Public Cloud Service Catalog offers:

  • A catalog of approved public cloud services for safe and easy discovery and on-boarding
  • Management reports on usage, cost, service levels, satisfaction
  • Service portfolio optimization
  • Lightweight service lifecycle and consumption flows

Today, HP offers the SaaS-based HP Public Cloud Service Catalog in a beta. This is exciting as it means that if you are an IT Manager juggling multiple Cloud offerings, you may qualify to be among the first enterprises to benefit from clear visibility and control of your organization’s public Cloud services.

  

Interested? Follow this link to preview a demo and to have an HP representative contact you to qualify as a HP Public Cloud Service Catalog beta customer to benefit from the service while providing HP with valuable feedback on the tool’s performance and to recommend improvements.

Comments
JudyRedman | ‎04-20-2011 01:32 PM

Jim, interesting post.  I see that Paul Muller also blogged about this Beta program at the bottom of a new post on the Executive CIO Forum at: http://www.enterprisecioforum.com/en/blogs/paulm/look-you-click-10-questions-ask-agreeing-cloud-serv...   His post talks about "click-wrap agreements"  and then he introduces the beta program. 

 

 JR

Leave a Comment

We encourage you to share your comments on this post. Comments are moderated and will be reviewed
and posted as promptly as possible during regular business hours

To ensure your comment is published, be sure to follow the Community Guidelines.

Be sure to enter a unique name. You can't reuse a name that's already in use.
Be sure to enter a unique email address. You can't reuse an email address that's already in use.
Type the characters you see in the picture above.Type the words you hear.
Search
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Do you mean 
About the Author
Jim is a technology marketer with over two decades experience in product launch, branding, and product marketing
Featured


Follow Us
The opinions expressed above are the personal opinions of the authors, not of HP. By using this site, you accept the Terms of Use and Rules of Participation.