Discover Performance Blog

Welcome to the Discover Performance blog, a resource for enterprise IT leaders who share a passion for performing better. Here you’ll find strategic insights and best practices from your peers as well as from HP’s own practitioners who help others define, measure and achieve better IT performances.

For additional in-depth articles on critical topics for IT executives, visit  http://hpsw.co/b7NWj4e

Charting your career path from CIO to CEO

polansky.jpgToday’s IT leaders are being asked to take on additional responsibilities beyond traditional IT functions, says IT recruiter Mark Polansky, and along with those new responsibilities come new opportunities. Polansky, a senior client partner at executive search and talent consulting service Korn Ferry, says that the doors to higher ranks—doors that had previously been closed to CIOs—are opening.

 

As co-author of the Korn Ferry report, “CIO to CEO: Aspiring CIOs Should Focus on Critical Behavioral Skills,” Polansky found that there are “now more business-oriented folks in the CIO seat who can play a bigger, broader role in the corporation, who are more operationally oriented.”

Labels: Leadership

CIO to CEO: Climbing the leadership ladder

Banerji.jpg

In the Deloitte CIO Survey 2013, the professional services firm found that many CIOs yearn to have a deeper impact on business strategy and move up the corporate ladder. Polling 700 CIOs and IT leaders from 36 countries, the survey found that nearly a half of the respondents were looking to further their careers in positions beyond IT. Aspiring to more senior roles in the executive management team—notably the COO or CEO role—and moving to a career outside of IT “may have been unlikely in the past,” the report found, “but our survey shows that attitudes and aspirations on this are starting to change.”

 

To connect the dots along the path from CIO to CEO in the real world, we caught up with Shawn Banerji, whom we spoke with last year about IT mentoring, succession and the changing role of the CIO. As a managing director at Russell Reynolds Associates, Banerji advises clients on the role of technology across the enterprise and helps them attract the leaders of the future. Banerji, too, sees the enterprise IT landscape shifting, but it’s not without challenges for IT leaders who want to move ahead.

Labels: Leadership

Change management: The CIO’s nightmare or dream-come-true?

mishra.jpg

DD Mishra is a partner at CIO Specialist Advisory LLP and a member of the Discover Performance community's IT Strategy & Performance LinkedIn group.

 

As CIOs are at the forefront of process and technology, change management must be a skill in the IT leader’s toolkit. Managing change has never been an easy task, with the accompanying natural human resistance as well as the organizational politics at play every organization to some degree. Successful changes manage to overcome the resistance or circumvent it entirely. Without a strong sponsor and commitment from the top, change management could be a touchy journey. Traditionally change management has followed a top-down approach. I call the traditional change management compulsive as it may not be initially acceptable to all of those involved, and it requires a carefully crafted approach.

Labels: Leadership

One CIO’s change management journey

mishra.jpg

DD Mishra is a partner at CIO Specialist Advisory LLP and a member of the Discover Performance community's IT Strategy & Performance LinkedIn group.

                                                                   

Lately, I find that my career has changed to the point that I am more of a change manager than an IT professional. When approaching an initiative, I first consider: Whose lives am I changing for the better? If the answer makes business sense, I go proceed with the initiative, subject to constraints imposed by the ecosystem.

 

When I look back, my interest in change management started in 1995 when I was working for a chemical plant that produced synthetic yarn. Although I was a programmer analyst, I enjoyed the significant piece of responsibility of keeping the lights on for production, warehouse, and stores—ensuring that enhancements were carried out and business expectations were met.

Labels: Leadership

Wi-Fi networks: Is the CIO wearing the emperor’s new clothes?

mishra.jpg

DD Mishra is a partner at CIO Specialist Advisory LLP and a member of the Discover Performance community's IT Strategy & Performance LinkedIn group.

 

As the economy continues to slow, CIOs are feeling the pinch to do more with less—cutting IT costs from every corner without reducing the services. If IT leaders trim their budgets wisely, the pain of tightening purse strings can actually lead to opportunities. Often untouched is the network piece of our infrastructure; in my view, it’s a window of opportunity, not just in terms of cost but agility as well.

 

Small and midsize businesses (and even some enterprises) use Wi-Fi networks exclusively as the means of providing connectivity to users. According to experts, the cost for deploying and managing a wireless network can be anywhere from 15-40 percent lower per employee versus wired alternatives for some companies; the savings potential can be as high as 70 percent, depending on the selection of providers and solutions.

Labels: Leadership

The I in CIO stands for “innovation”

mishra.jpg

DD Mishra is a partner at CIO Specialist Advisory LLP and a member of the Discover Performance community's IT Strategy & Performance LinkedIn group.

 

During a recent discussion on one of the LinkedIn forums, I asked members about upcoming trends and key areas of focus important to them and other CIOs. Leading the responses: innovation. This was unsurprising, as smart IT leaders always keep an eye on helping their organizations thrive and generate greater value—especially during a recession; as markets become more competitive, the need for innovation grows stronger.

 

How does a CIO create a culture of creativity and innovation when the rest of the business is busy keeping the lights on? How does a CIO get buy-in from business when most attempts to do so are challenged from the top? As the financial crisis looms large, how does a CIO create opportunities to get more funding to try out new concepts, ideas and innovations for business?

Labels: Leadership

Managing change from the CIO's perspective

mishra.jpg

DD Mishra is a partner at CIO Specialist Advisory LLP and a member of the Discover Performance community's IT Strategy & Performance LinkedIn group.

 

Managing change from the CIO's perspective

 

CIOs who become adept at leading and managing change in an organization move a step closer to becoming business leaders, and no longer just technology stewards. Organizational change, however, is not without its pains; there is no singular road map for managing change, and it is more art than science. Thus, the role of change leader is tricky, as dealing with politics of change requires a variety of skills.

Labels: Leadership

How IT can benefit from strategic outsourcing

mishra.jpgDD Mishra is a partner at CIO Specialist Advisory LLP and a member of the Discover Performance community's IT Strategy & Performance LinkedIn group.

Strategic IT outsourcing works very much like a marriage—both parties must live with both the benefits and the drawbacks of the partnership. Outsourcing is tempting to enterprises for a number of reasons that emanate from various corner offices. The CIO may be acting on an agenda that includes outsourcing as a catalyst for change; the CFO's may be on a mission to move from capex to opex wherever possible; perhaps outsourcing is what underpins the CEO's master plan to gain new market share. From fear of competition to leveraging brand value, business cases are meant to justify big decisions such as outsourcing.

 

 

Labels: Leadership

Why CIOs should help their CEOs become technically proficient

mishra.jpg

DD Mishra is a partner at CIO Specialist Advisory LLP, and a member of the Discover Performance community's IT Strategy & Performance LinkedIn group.

 

As the CIO/CTO role has matured over the years, successful technology leaders have taken up the mantle of aligning their job with the goals of the business. Modern IT leaders not only speak the same language as the business side, but they must understand (and be able to explain) the business value of IT, as well as justify IT spends.

 

Yet the same question is rarely asked for the business side: Must a CEO understand technology to lead effectively and run a successful enterprise?

Labels: Leadership

IT executives must align technology with business

mishra.jpg

By DD Mishra

 

Currently a partner at CIO Specialist Advisory LLP, DD Mishra has more than 19 years of experience in IT. He has played key roles, including IT governance and outsourcing, program and portfolio management, consultancy, presales and delivery for various customers in the UK, India and Singapore and has experience from both the buyer side and seller side. He is a member of the Discover Performance community's IT Strategy & Performance LinkedIn group.

 

Partnerships cannot develop unless the parties involved are aligned. When an organization matures, IT can move from its role as cost center to value creator. To get there, the CIO must participate in the business and be seen as a business leader; a business that fails to involve the CIO in such a manner will miss out on the potential that technology can deliver to its top line or bottom line.

 

CIOs who view every opportunity through the narrow window of technology risk extinction. Today's CIOs are business-oriented and speak business more than they do about underlying technology. So how do CIOs align IT with business? It’s a transformation achieved only by alignment, which can happen through the following means:

Labels: Leadership

Beware the 3 deadly P’s of success

Joel Dobbs.GIFBy Joel Dobbs

You are never closer to your greatest failure than when you are at the moment of your greatest success. –Craig Winn
 
This quote, from a Businessweek article in 2000, is perhaps one of the best pieces of business wisdom. Success is as addictive as an opiate and potentially just as dangerous.

H. Ross Perot once said, “Something in human nature causes us to start slacking off at our moment of greatest accomplishment. As you become successful, you will need a great deal of self-discipline not to lose your sense of balance, humility, and commitment.”  Great leaders stay great because they stay focused on what is important and don’t fall into the traps that ensnare many.  Success can breed arrogance, over-confidence and the false belief that we are invincible. We’re not.

Labels: Leadership
Search
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Do you mean 
About the Author(s)
  • Alec Wagner is a longtime writer & editor, enterprise IT insider, and (generally) fearless digital nomad.
  • Lending 20 years of IT market expertise across 5 continents, for defining moments as an innovation adoption change agent.
  • This account is for guest bloggers. The blog post will identify the blogger.
  • I'm the community manager for Discover Performance and have been a writer/editor in the technology field for several years.
  • Mike has been with HP for 30 years. Half of that time was in R&D, mainly as an architect. The other 15 years has been spent in product management, product marketing, and now, solution marketing. .
  • Paul Muller leads the global IT management evangelist team within the Software business at HP. In this role, Muller heads the team responsible for fostering HP’s participation in the IT management community, contributing to and communicating best-practice in helping IT perform better.
  • Rafael Brugnini (Rafa) serves as VP of EMEA & APJ for HP Software. Joining in 1996 and has more than 20 years of knowledge and experience linked to HP. He resides in Madrid with his wife and family, and in his spare time he enjoys windsurfing.
  • Evangelist for IT Financial Management (ITFM), IT Governance and IT Portfolio Management, consulting IT organisations for Close to 15 years on principles of good governance.
  • Chief of Staff for Software & Information Management IT at HP, driving business and IT initiatives, as well as executive, employee, and customer communications and management of change for the CIO of HP Software.
HP Blog

HP Software Solutions Blog

Featured


Follow Us
Labels
The opinions expressed above are the personal opinions of the authors, not of HP. By using this site, you accept the Terms of Use and Rules of Participation.