Discover Performance Blog

Welcome to the Discover Performance blog, a resource for enterprise IT leaders who share a passion for performing better. Here you’ll find strategic insights and best practices from your peers as well as from HP’s own practitioners who help others define, measure and achieve better IT performances.

For additional in-depth articles on critical topics for IT executives, visit  http://hpsw.co/b7NWj4e

Essential CIO skill: Self-promotion

brian_mcdonough.jpgBy Brian McDonough, Discover Performance managing editor

 

The newest issue of Discover Performance includes an article summarizing the lessons of the debut chapter of the Enterprise 20/20 crowdsourced ebook, describing the skills that CIOs—or aspiring CIOs—will need to have on their resumes by 2020. The e20/20 community focused on four attributes that will be critical to becoming one of these future IT executives: Driver of innovation, cross-discipline collaborator, information enabler, and balancer of security, risk and performance. 

 

Piet Loubser, a senior director in HP Software who focuses on metrics, suggests there should be a fifth vital attribute: the ability to communicate these skills and their results.   “It seems to me that the CIO will compete with lines of business for technology dollars,” Loubser notes, “and the CIO will not only have to be good at these four things, but will have to be able to demonstrate it continuously to the CEO and the rest of the business.”

Labels: CIO leadership

Homework for the successful IT Leader—finding and putting disruptive technology to work

Joel Dobbs.GIFGuest post by Joel H. Dobbs 

Joel H. Dobbs is the CEO and President of The Compass Talent Management Group LLC (CTMG), a consulting firm that assists organizations with the identification and development of key talent and with designing organizational strategies and structures to maximize their ability to compete in the business worlds of today and tomorrow. He is also an executive coach and serves as Executive in Residence at the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Business.  Joel is also a popular and frequent contributor to the Executive CIO Forum where a version of this article was first published.

 

 

CIOs and IT leaders simply must do their due diligence. If you don’t do your homework someone else will and you will come out looking foolish, or worse. The ability to objectively and critically evaluate emerging technologies may be the single most important technical skill CIOs need in the years ahead.

Labels: CIO leadership
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About the Author(s)
  • Alec Wagner is a longtime writer & editor, enterprise IT insider, and (generally) fearless digital nomad.
  • Lending 20 years of IT market expertise across 5 continents, for defining moments as an innovation adoption change agent.
  • This account is for guest bloggers. The blog post will identify the blogger.
  • I'm the community manager for Discover Performance and have been a writer/editor in the technology field for several years.
  • Mike has been with HP for 30 years. Half of that time was in R&D, mainly as an architect. The other 15 years has been spent in product management, product marketing, and now, solution marketing. .
  • Paul Muller leads the global IT management evangelist team within the Software business at HP. In this role, Muller heads the team responsible for fostering HP’s participation in the IT management community, contributing to and communicating best-practice in helping IT perform better.
  • Rafael Brugnini (Rafa) serves as VP of EMEA & APJ for HP Software. Joining in 1996 and has more than 20 years of knowledge and experience linked to HP. He resides in Madrid with his wife and family, and in his spare time he enjoys windsurfing.
  • Evangelist for IT Financial Management (ITFM), IT Governance and IT Portfolio Management, consulting IT organisations for Close to 15 years on principles of good governance.
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