Discover Performance Blog

Welcome to the Discover Performance blog, a resource for enterprise IT leaders who share a passion for performing better. Here you’ll find strategic insights and best practices from your peers as well as from HP’s own practitioners who help others define, measure and achieve better IT performances.

For additional in-depth articles on critical topics for IT executives, visit  http://hpsw.co/b7NWj4e

Displaying articles for: March 2013

Cyber risk report: Is your security vulnerable in these key areas

aw-tendo-glam.jpg

Although it’s being promoted as a “risky read,” this month’s lead story on Discover Performance is a sure bet for security-minded IT leaders (and that should be all IT leaders). “Hackers target mobile platforms and older avenues” explores the HP 2012 Cyber Risk Report, an up-to-the-minute assessment of top vulnerabilities and strategic lapses that vex today’s enterprises.

 

Here are some key findings from the report:

 

Critical vulnerabilities declined, but still pose a mammoth risk

 

In 2012, high-severity vulnerabilities made up 20 of all vulnerabilities reported, down from 23 percent in 2011. Still, the HP report stresses that nearly one in five vulnerabilities can provide hackers with full control of a target.

How good is your IT organization at responding to your requests? IT value chains: request to fulfill

IMG_1614-Edit_SML.jpgIn “What every business leader should know about IT management,” I shared that it was possible for business leaders to understand “what’s going on” in IT by understanding the five value chains of IT. In this post, I will review the third value chain, request to fulfill, having reviewed require to deploy in my last post.

Do you have horse DNA in your IT supply chain?

 

bsantos_Horse.png

As IT starts to use cloud suppliers to provide more of the functionality the business needs, we have to be careful to choose our suppliers and to monitor their performance carefully.

 

There are a lot of parallels between this and the supply chains that the food industry uses. In Europe, it has emerged that many "beef products" actually contain horse meat.

 

Europeoan food manufacturers are now promising to monitor their multi-step supply chains much more closely. 

Open Services and their impact on enterprise IT

keithmacbeath.jpg

By KeithMacbeath, senior principal consultant with HP Software Professional Services

 

Cloud computing represents disruptive change, not incremental change, both for IT production and IT consumption. In my last few blog posts I’ve been writing about changes to the production side: How you can plan for disruptive improvement in IT operations, what financial consequences you need to consider for cloud computing and how to make sure you get your cloud adoption model right to reap those financial benefits.

 

But in this post I want to look at the impact of cloud on the consumption side, particularly around something I’m going to call Open Services.

 

What are Open Services?

Open Services are simply the latest evolution in a ‘decoupling’ trend that’s been going on for decades. Think back to the days when mainframes dominated enterprise computing. It was the age of proprietary computing: Everything you did was machine specific. When you did an upgrade you had to rewrite all your software. Customers hated the migration cost and the vendor lock-in.

Labels: cloud computing
Search
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Do you mean 
Featured


Follow Us
Labels
The opinions expressed above are the personal opinions of the authors, not of HP. By using this site, you accept the Terms of Use and Rules of Participation.