Discover Performance Blog

Welcome to the Discover Performance blog, a resource for enterprise IT leaders who share a passion for performing better. Here you’ll find strategic insights and best practices from your peers as well as from HP’s own practitioners who help others define, measure and achieve better IT performances.

For additional in-depth articles on critical topics for IT executives, visit  http://hpsw.co/b7NWj4e

Displaying articles for: March 2013

Cyber risk report: Is your security vulnerable in these key areas

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Although it’s being promoted as a “risky read,” this month’s lead story on Discover Performance is a sure bet for security-minded IT leaders (and that should be all IT leaders). “Hackers target mobile platforms and older avenues” explores the HP 2012 Cyber Risk Report, an up-to-the-minute assessment of top vulnerabilities and strategic lapses that vex today’s enterprises.

 

Here are some key findings from the report:

 

Critical vulnerabilities declined, but still pose a mammoth risk

 

In 2012, high-severity vulnerabilities made up 20 of all vulnerabilities reported, down from 23 percent in 2011. Still, the HP report stresses that nearly one in five vulnerabilities can provide hackers with full control of a target.

How good is your IT organization at responding to your requests? IT value chains: request to fulfill

IMG_1614-Edit_SML.jpgIn “What every business leader should know about IT management,” I shared that it was possible for business leaders to understand “what’s going on” in IT by understanding the five value chains of IT. In this post, I will review the third value chain, request to fulfill, having reviewed require to deploy in my last post.

Do you have horse DNA in your IT supply chain?

 

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As IT starts to use cloud suppliers to provide more of the functionality the business needs, we have to be careful to choose our suppliers and to monitor their performance carefully.

 

There are a lot of parallels between this and the supply chains that the food industry uses. In Europe, it has emerged that many "beef products" actually contain horse meat.

 

Europeoan food manufacturers are now promising to monitor their multi-step supply chains much more closely. 

Open Services and their impact on enterprise IT

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By KeithMacbeath, senior principal consultant with HP Software Professional Services

 

Cloud computing represents disruptive change, not incremental change, both for IT production and IT consumption. In my last few blog posts I’ve been writing about changes to the production side: How you can plan for disruptive improvement in IT operations, what financial consequences you need to consider for cloud computing and how to make sure you get your cloud adoption model right to reap those financial benefits.

 

But in this post I want to look at the impact of cloud on the consumption side, particularly around something I’m going to call Open Services.

 

What are Open Services?

Open Services are simply the latest evolution in a ‘decoupling’ trend that’s been going on for decades. Think back to the days when mainframes dominated enterprise computing. It was the age of proprietary computing: Everything you did was machine specific. When you did an upgrade you had to rewrite all your software. Customers hated the migration cost and the vendor lock-in.

Labels: cloud computing

How HP internal IT is using cloud and BYOD to cut costs, boost morale

16C.Heather-Tendo Communications SF-STOLL 2012.jpgI don’t know if you saw it, but recently HP Executive Vice President of Technology and Operations John Hinshaw was in the news speaking about HP’s embrace of BYOD and software as a service (SaaS). The takeaways are interesting enough I wanted to share them with readers.

 

We know from responses to past issues of Discover Performance that BYOD and SaaS are areas of primary concern for our audience. (Our article, 4 steps to securing the BYOD world was our most read-read article of 2012, while an article on strategic SaaS sourcing came in at No. 4.) What’s notable from these pieces about HP is what’s happening at the large enterprise level: major changes in how IT is sourced and managed.

Labels: byod| SaaS

Your adoption strategy can make or break your private cloud: Here are 3 ways to get it right

keithmacbeath.jpgBy KeithMacbeath, senior principal consultant with HP Software Professional Services

 

 

In my last post I wrote about the huge potential benefits that organizations can reap from adopting some form of cloud delivery. But you don’t see these benefits if you do cloud as an isolated science project. Many organizations spend a lot of time thinking about their cloud production model and ignore the other aspect: adoption.

 

There’s a high risk that if you don’t think carefully about adoption you will end up spending a huge amount on an environment that then gets lightly used. When that happens your CFO will say, “You told me cloud would radically improve our cost structure, but your costs have only gone up! What is going on here?”

 

Well that’s because if you create this fabulous private cloud or managed cloud that you’re paying for but it’s not widely used, then it won’t move the dial at all on your total financial numbers. So your challenge is not just to stand it up but to get it used. It’s not just production, it’s adoption. Here are three successful models we’re seeing with our customers.

 

Labels: cloud strategy
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