HP Discover 2013: Meg Whitman shares HP’s vision for the new style of IT

IMG_0219.JPGActor Kevin Bacon opened this year’s Discover keynote by proclaiming that the theory of six degrees of separation has been narrowed to 4.7 degrees.

 

He predicted an end to separation altogether, noting that the future of our planet will be based on connectedness. On a human level, parents need to become closer to their children and individuals must become closer to their communities. Likewise, businesses must become closer to their employees and even closer to their customers. Mobility and apps are driving all of this change, providing the constant connectivity you need to maintain all your data at your fingertips. It is the power of more people having the information to work together—simply put, zero degrees of separation.

 

Whitman.jpgCEO Meg Whitman followed by saying this is the type of relationship HP wants to have with its customers. HP wants to become the best technology partner for IT leaders. She said customers have been at the heart of this company since it was started. Whitman met with over 500 customers during the past year, and she has seen megatrends impacting them including cloud, big data and mobility.

 

Today’s challenges are new. We are going through a cycle that happens every 15 years. “And who better to help IT customers with the new model than the company that created the old model?” At its core, she said HP is about managing the complexities of the new world of IT. HP is going to be here for the long run. HP has gotten its act together: “We have strengthened our financial performance, stabilized our business, and invested more in R&D than ever before. HP is here to stay.

 

We call the place where IT needs to go the new style of IT—a new style of business. HP is shifting everything to support this change. We want to help customers provide the lower cost, agility and speed that their business needs and wants. Taking nine months to achieve Version 1 doesn’t work anymore. The new style of IT is no longer about keeping the computer running. It is about creating bridges between IT and the business. Fundamentally, cloud, mobility, big data and security are about the ability to work from just about anywhere from a smart phone, as well as the hyper-competitive environment that results from this change.

 

Whitman gave real-world examples of the new style of IT from Nationwide, United Airlines and NASCAR. NASCAR, in particular, has used HP’s Big Data and Autonomy solutions to better understand the “narrative of the sport and the tenor of fan sentiment” in social media. The organization can measure things that it never could before. When Chevrolet introduced a new car, NASCAR’s fan and media and engagement center was able to provide a synthesis of popular reaction to the car—within an hour of the car’s introduction. NASCAR’s CMO said it is helping the organization achieve a new level of customer engagement. He shared an amazing example of a race being delayed, and while the course was being dried, NASCAR could see what fans were saying, answer fan questions and even tell Fox Sports what to talk about.

 

Simply put, the new style of IT is about:

 

  • driving better results across your entire organization
  • making our customers a hero with the red cape
  • separating the distance between us and our customers

We know that this new style of IT is about moving from managing to delivering. This way, we can be the best technology partner for you. We want you to consider customers as partners, because it’s time to build a better enterprise, together.

 

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About the Author
Mr. Suer is a senior manager for IT Performance Management. Prior to this role, Mr. Suer headed IT Performance Management Analytics Product ...


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