Go Forth and Automate That!

automate that.jpgThose of you that know me, know that I live in San Diego, California. In San Diego, the biggest weather related decision  is whether you can wear flip flops outside. For those who are wondering how this relates IT scorecards and dashboards hang on for just a moment. Anyway, last week it was rainy and cold enough to get snow to our local Mountains. At the same time, I was asked to go to the North Country to present to a major financial institution on the HP Executive Scorecard. I kept looking at www.weather.com and I could not believe my eyes. I did not need an overcoat or even really a sweater. How could this be the case when it was rainy and cold in San Diego.

 

When I got to the North Country, I was fortunate to receive a warm reception from a very interesting new Vice President of Applications – let’s call her Mary. Mary and her team were manually building scorecards and dashboards for the extended IT management team. Mary was using these, as it turned out, not only to establish her position within the IT organization, but more importantly to establish credibility for the IT organization as a whole with its business customers.

 

This was absolutely an amazing step for a Vice President of Applications to take on, but if you think about it, this is the role within IT that has the most contact with business customers and the greatest case put on it to demonstrate business value. When I asked Mary about her goals, she said we need to drive consensus on measurement throughout the IT organization. At this point, I asked her about how she was measuring and the role technology could play to help here.

 

Mary took a moment here and pointed around the room and said we are doing this today. We are doing it all in Excel. When I asked about the importance of real time measurement, Mary said simple, it would allow them to move from a report-like approach to really managing the IT organization for the business.

 

With this, I spent some time describing how HP Software and Solutions could help. Given her use of Excel, I focused on how we could automatically pull data from this source and that source. At one point a collogue said that we could also link to Excel itself. Before I could say this is an option where data is not in a database, Mary said to me “No. This may be good for an early implementation phase, but we need to automate this to manage and improve.” She gets it. If the data in the scorecard is automated, she and her peers can hold people accountable for their performance because they have daily chances to fix things. In others, an automated scorecard allows her to drive performance driven culture across the entire IT organization. Need I say more—go forward and automate that!

 

Related links:

 Feature:  Peak performance demands precision control

Solution page:  IT performance management

Twitter: @MylesSuer

Labels: IT strategy
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About the Author
Mr. Suer is a senior manager for IT Performance Management. Prior to this role, Mr. Suer headed IT Performance Management Analytics Product ...
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