Re: ps -el -> wchan details (904 Views)
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Frequent Advisor
Posts: 68
Registered: ‎10-03-2005
Message 1 of 5 (927 Views)
Accepted Solution

ps -el -> wchan details

Dear Readers

 

I'm searching a simple way to get some infos about several processes from the running system.

 

Seeing the wchan field i do not understand to interpret the values:

 

  F S        UID   PID  PPID  C PRI NI             ADDR   SZ            WCHAN TTY          TIME CMD
1003 S          0    24     0  0 152 20 e0000003bc6ac980    0 e00000046801b1e0 ?        00:00:00 net_str_cached
                                        
So any helpful inoformation how to interpret the wchan field (e00000046801b1e0) is welcome.

 

Greetings

Kasper_USB

Honored Contributor
Posts: 13,901
Registered: ‎06-21-2000
Message 2 of 5 (925 Views)

Re: ps -el -> wchan details

This appears to be a good thread on WCHAN:

 

http://h30499.www3.hp.com/t5/Databases/WCHAN-field-in-ps/m-p/3248909#M26433

 

According the the ps (1) man page:

wchan

The event for which the process is waiting or sleeping; if there is none, a hyphen (-) is displayed.


Acclaimed Contributor
Posts: 26,039
Registered: ‎03-06-2006
Message 3 of 5 (923 Views)

Re: ps -el -> wchan details

>Seeing the wchan field I do not understand to interpret the values:

 

The event for which the process is waiting or sleeping; if there is none, a hyphen is displayed.

 

It appears you can only see a non-zero kernel address or "-".  And possibly compare the values to other processes.

Frequent Advisor
Posts: 68
Registered: ‎10-03-2005
Message 4 of 5 (912 Views)

Re: ps -el -> wchan details

So if there is a number in wchan-field, is there a way to say what kind of event the process is waiting or sleeping ?
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Acclaimed Contributor
Posts: 26,039
Registered: ‎03-06-2006
Message 5 of 5 (904 Views)

Re: ps -el -> wchan details

>if there is a number in wchan field, is there a way to say what kind of event the process is waiting or sleeping?

 

Did you look at Patrick's link?  This is an address and you need to dump kernel memory to look at what's there.

Or use nm(1) to see if that address has a name that means something.

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