Business Service Management (BAC/BSM/APM/NNM)
More than everything monitoring, BSM provides the means to determine how IT impacts the bottom line. Its purpose and main benefit is to ensure that IT Operations are able to reactively and proactively determine where they should be spending their time to best impact the business. This covers event management to solve immediate issues, resource allocation and through reporting performance based on the data of applications, infrastructure, networks and from third-party platforms. BSM includes powerful analytics that gives IT the means to prepare, predict and pinpoint by learning behavior and analyzing IT data forward and backwards in time using Big Data Analytics applied to IT Operations.

HP and Microsoft, how does this help me manage my IT environment?

by Michael Procopio



 HP and Microsoft recently made a joint announcement, saying they intend to invest $250 million over the next three years to significantly simplify technology environments for customers.


 It included many parts of the HP Enterprise Business products. But, what does this really mean to customers who use HP Software & Solutions products?


This was a huge announcement in terms of the number of different parts. The clearest write-up I have seen covering the whole announcement is on a TechNet blog.


Indeed, a portion of this announcement was to say ‘these two companies are writing a $250M check to fund additional R&D on joint solutions.’ I’m guessing that means some smart folks got together and realized that expanding the long-standing relationship between the two companies would have an extremely positive impact for customers.


I have seen a number of blog posts that don’t seem to ‘get’ the value in the announcement. However, Jim Frey, in aNetwork World blog post, seems to understand what we are trying to accomplish. He wrote:


“The result could just be the most complete story for Cloud that we have seen to date. It includes hypervisor technology that IBM does not. It addresses the application software that VCE does not. And, it includes the infrastructure technologies that Oracle does not.”


So here’s what I think the announcement means to HP Software & Solutions customers.


In a sentence


HP and Microsoft are working together to make infrastructure management and application management better—whether it is physical or virtual (including Hyper-V) with new integrations between software products.


Details


1/ HP Business Service Management (BSM) will collaborate with HP Insight Software (from HP’s Enterprise Server group) and Microsoft (System Center) to provide integrated and interoperable virtualization and management solutions to reduce complexity in the datacenter.


Note: HP Insight Software provides hardware level and remote management for HP hardware. It also provides control of your Windows, HP-UX, Linux, OpenVMS and NonStop environments.


It means: if you have a multi-OS/hypervisor environment, including Windows you get an integrated solution to monitor and manage your servers.


2/ HP will work with Microsoft to provide bi-directional integrations between HP Business Service Management and Microsoft System Center for enterprise systems and application monitoring. 


It means: if you have a multi-OS/hypervisor environment, including Windows you get a heterogeneous solution to monitor and manage servers, the software on them and end-user performance. HP Software has HP Operation Manager including HP SiteScope for server management and HP BPM and HP RUM modules of HP BAC for end user management.


3/ In addition, we will develop bi-directional integrations between HP Business Service Automation (BSA) and Microsoft System Center for OS, application provisioning and compliance management.


It means: if you have a multi-OS/hypervisor environment, including Windows you get a heterogeneous solution for configuration and compliance (checks that servers are configured per your policies) management.


4/ For the SMB market (defined as customers with 50 servers or less), there will be “Virtualization Smart bundles” with prepackaged elements of HP Operation Center.


It means: Virtualization solutions are easier to buy and deploy since it is in one bundled package. There is a separate document on “Virtualization Smart bundles.”


Related Items:



 


Get the latest updates on our Twitter feed @HPITOps http://twitter.com/HPITOps


Join the HP OpenView & Operations Management group on LinkedIn.



 



 

2009 "What's New" tops the list of posts

 


by Michael Procopio


Happy New Year to everyone. The new year is a good time to reflect on the
previous year and look into the new year.


Thanks to all of you we have had 10s of thousands of view. A special thank
you to those who comment and help continue the conversation.



For the retrospective lets review the top 10 posts for 2009.



One
brand new product and two major enhancements to the BSM stack - Vienna HP
Software Universe 2008


HP
Business Availability Center 8.02 What's New


The
new Operations Manager i (OMi)


How
does BSM improve IT Operations' efficiency?


Announcing
Business Availability Center 8.0


BSM
customer evolution paths: Samples and observations
 – this is one of a series
on BSM evolution paths 


Not
true, IBM


BAC
8.03 release - what's new


RUM
the Real User Experience Manager


Webinar
- "The Cloud and Your Applications: What is the Impact on Application
Management"


Going forward the big news in HP Software and Solutions social media is our
upcoming online user community. You can be part of the founding, see the new
blog for the community -  
HP
Software Solutions Community - join Project Alpha!


As always, please let us know what you want to hear about. Hears to a great
2010.


 


photo by legalnonresident 


 

HP Software Universe 2009 Hamburg Day 2

by Michael Procopio


Just over 3200 attendees at the show this year.


Each of the last eight years at the European Universe, Ulrich Pfeiffer, CTO for IT Management in EMEA creates a Live in Action demo showcasing the fictitious Full Throttle Company (FTC) on mainstage. Live in Action is a demonstration of HP Software integrated into a complete solution.


 



Ulrich Pfeiffer


 


This year, the Live in Action team recalled Hamburg of the early 1960s when this German city gave the Beatles a start before the group became a mainstream sensation. The demo featured the HP Performance Optimized Datacenter (“POD”), a datacenter in a container, along with music by the re-Beatles band and an on-stage yellow submarine in a disaster recovery scenario involving a flooded datacenter.


The POD is a standard container completely fitted with servers, storage and HVAC. You can see the POD demo here.


BTO (Business Technology Optimization) solutions demoed live on stage showed capabilities in three areas: 1) business and disaster recovery; 2) service recovery and web security; and 3) business improvements to avoid service disruptions and enhance capacity via virtualization management.


Disaster recovery highlighted HP Operations Orchestration configuring the POD to the state of the original datacenter.


Web security started with finding the problem using End User Monitoring, HP SiteScope and HP Problem Isolation. The problem was a hacked web site. The knowledge base in HP Service Manager (SM) which was populated during QA testing by HP Quality Center has the solution to the problem.   QA had not originally done security testing on every release but it is now added to their plan in HP Quality Center (QC) to run HP Security Center.


HP WebInspect, was run directly from SM. The test failed and WebInspect automatically created a ticket in SM for the QA team.  Once the QC test passes the SM ticket is automatically closed.


The website having the problem was supporting a reseller using a configuration utility to order Snowmobiles, a new business line for FTC. When Ulrich, playing CIO for FTC, called the reseller to tell him service was restored the reseller claimed his SLA (Service Level Agreement) was violated and would not pay. Ulrich brought up HP Service Level Manager to show that while any further downtime would violate the SLA, it was currently in tact.


Now that the problems is solved the infrastructure manager looks to see how the failure happened and what can be done to prevent it in the future.


They review the infrastructure using HP Asset Manager and Operations Manager Virtualization Smart Plug-in, both now running on Linux. The CIO wants this Virtualization data to show up in his 360 degree dashboard and it does.


It is much more fun to watch and it was video recorded which will be up after the holidays.


Related items:



 

Operations: application performance sucks, what do I do now?

by Michael Procopio


In my IT days (it has been a while) as still happens today this is the question many have asked. It’s more complicated today, applications are more distributed now. However, you still have to go through the triage process. The topic these days is named “Application Performance Management” or APM.


APM has two parts, the traditional looking at infrastructure resources and measuring performance from the end user perspective.


You probably detected this problem in one of two ways. You are ahead of the curve and have end user monitoring in place or the user called the help desk to complain.


A typical web based application today uses a web server, application server and a backend, typically a database. Though the backend might actually have multiple parts if service oriented architecture, (SOA) is used. Good news, Operations Manager, agent based, and SiteScope, agentless, will provide status on condition of those servers.


These tools can also look at how packaged applications are doing on the server. Oracle, WebSphere, MS Exchange, MS Active Directory, to name a few, can be monitored by either Operations Agents or have SiteScope templates (a SiteScope template is a prepackaged set of monitors). These tools might point to something as detailed as database locks being far higher than normal and beyond the current setting on the database. A quick parameter change might fix this.


Next, we have the code. We hope this isn’t the case because this typically moves the problem from operations to development. However, Operations is still responsible for pinpointing the problem area. This is typically the domain of application support and in some organizations that’s inside Operations, in others a different group.


Here Business Transaction Management (BTM) tools can help. BTM manages from a transaction point of view. BTM includes transaction tracing. TransactionVision and Diagnostics work in a complimentary fashion to give you the next level of detail although each is usable separately. TransactionVision traces individual critical transactions (as you define them) through multiple servers; it gives you information on a specific transaction including the value of the transaction.


Diagnostics provides aggregate information on all transactions in a composite application giving you timing information. It can pinpoint:


· where time is spent in an application; either processing data or waiting for a response from another part of the application.


· the slowest layers.


· the slowest server requests which are the application entry points.


· outliers to help diagnose intermittent problems.


· threads that may be contributing to performance issues.


· memory problems and garbage collection issues.


· the fastest growing and largest size collections.


· leaking objects, object growth trends, object instance counts, and the byte size for objects.


· the slowest SQL query and report query information.


· exception counts and trace information which often go undetected.


TransactionVision and Diagnostics also integrate with Business Availability Center, which means you can start with a topology view and drill all the way down to find the status of the most valuable transaction running through you systems.


You can manage what you can’t measure. So what do I do now? If you are properly instrumented the problem will show itself. If you don’t find something you can fix, you can tell the app developers where they need to look to fix the problem.


   


Related Items:


· End User Monitoring


· Operations Manager


· SiteScope


· SiteScope Administrator Forum


· TransactionVision


· Diagnostics


· Business Availability Center





BAC 8.03 release - what's new

by Michael Procopio


Release Highlights






  • Service Level Management (SLM) enhancements:






    • SLM now enables customization of the First day of month setting which is used in calculating agreements.




    • A new business rule, EMS Events Availability, calculates status for the System Availability KPI assigned to an EMS Monitor CI. This enables you to include EMS events as part of the SLM calculation.






  • Platform enhancements:






    • Update of Java Runtime Environment running on Business Availability Center servers to JRE 1.5.0_18




    • Mutual authentication: Users can set up authentication for both the Discovery and Dependency Mapping (DDM) Probe and Business Availability Center running an embedded UCMDB, with certificates. The certificate for each side is sent and authenticated before the connection is established.






  • Real User Monitor Engine enhancements:






    • Support for Oracle Forms NCA version 10g






  • System Availability Management enhancement:






    • Added the ability to control the location of the ellipsis ("...") used in long labels in System Availability Management Reports. This enables you to move the ellipsis from the end to the middle of the label.






  • Dashboard enhancement:






    • Added the ability to drill down from Dashboard to the Event Log report from Windows and UNIX CIs.






  • TransactionVision enhancement:






    • Support for LW-SSO 2.2 has been added to the UI/Job Server.




    • Database Admin privileges are no longer required to set up a database for use with TransactionVision.





    For Business Availability Center, Michael Procopio


    Get the latest updates on our Twitter feed @HPITOps http://twitter.com/HPITOps


    Join the HP Software group on LinkedIn and/or the Business Availability Center group on LinkedIn.


     




RUM the Real User Experience Manager

by Michael Procopio


RUM or Real User Monitor is a tool to monitor actual user traffic running over your network.


Its part of our EUM or end user management suite. In the area of EUM there are two primary ways to monitor 1/ synthetic, which is covered by BPM or Business Process Monitor and 2/ real user monitoring.


Each has its place in a monitoring strategy. BPM is good for making sure things are up 24x7, even when no users are using your applications. Real user monitoring can give you information down to the specific user.


When I first moved over to BAC group and heard about RUM, I was impressed. One of the things it can do is replicate a users web session click by click. This allows someone troubleshooting a problem to see exactly what happened and what the error message was the user saw – no guessing. (sensitive data like passwords and credit cards are filtered out in memory before writing to a disk). Further, if you do find a problem it can turn the session into a script that can be passed to the QA team to replicate the problem, if they are using LoadRunner.


How does it work? It starts by capturing packets as they go over the network. This is done by a RUM Probe, which is software that runs on a dedicated piece of x86 hardware (typically). The Probe passes the relevant data to the RUM engine.


The RUM engine stores the data and key performance metrics are aggregated before being sent up to BAC for reporting and alerting. For example, an alert might be round trip time for the Savings Deposit transaction is taking too long. Here are some of the reports RUM provides:



  • Global Statistics

  • Page Summary

  • Transaction Summary

  • End User Summary

  • End User Over Time

  • Server Over Time

  • Session Analyzer

  • TCP Application Summary

  • TCP Application Over Time

  • Event Summary

  • Business Process Distribution



Figure: Example RUM deployment configuration


Originally RUM strictly focused on HTTP/S traffic. But a while back support was expanded to due general tracking of TCP traffic, both streaming and non-streaming. In more recent releases additional upper level protocol analysis has been added. Beyond HTTP/S current support includes:



  • XML/SOAP

  • Siebel

  • WebSphere

  • MPLS


Related Items:



For Business Availability Center, Michael Procopio


Get the latest updates on our Twitter feed @HPITOps http://twitter.com/HPITOps


Join the HP Software group on LinkedIn and/or the Business Availability Center group on LinkedIn.


 

Fighting or friendly, Problem Isolation and OMi

by Michael Procopio


In the post  Event Correlation OMi TBEC and Problem Isolation What's the Difference, my fellow blogger, Jon Haworth, discussed the differences between TBEC and Problem Isolation. To be consistent, I'll use the acronyms PI for Problem Isolation and TBEC to refer to OMi (Operations Manager i series) Topology Based Event Correlation.


Briefly, he mentioned that TBEC works “bottom up”, that is starting from the infrastructure, with events. PI works “top down”, that is, starting from an end user experience problem, primarily with metric (time series) data.


Jon did an excellent job describing TBEC; I’ll do my best on PI because like Jon I have a conscience to settle.


Problem Isolation is a tool to:


1. automate the steps a troubleshooter would go through


2. run additional tests that might uncover the problem


3. look at all metric/performance data from the end user experience monitoring and all the infrastructure it depends


4. find the infrastructure metric the most closely matches the end user problem using behavior learning and regression analysis techniques (developed by HP Labs)


5. bring additional data such as events, help/service desk tickets and changes to the troubleshooter


6. allow the troubleshooter to execute Run books to potentially solve the problem


Potentially the biggest difference in the underlying technology is that Problem Isolation does not require any correlation rules or thresholds to be set for it to do the regression analysis to point to the problem. Like TBEC, it does require that an application be modeled in a CMDB.


An example: Presume a situation with a typical composite application - web server, application server and database. No infrastructure thresholds were violated; therefore, there are no infrastructure alerts. Again, as mentioned in the previous post, end user monitoring (EUM) is the back stop. EUM alerts on slow end user performance, now what?


Here is what Problem Isolation does:


1. determines which infrastructure elements (ITIL configurations items or CIs) support the transaction


2. reruns the test(s) that caused the alert – this validates it is not transient problem


3. runs any additional tests defined for the CIs


4. collects Service Level Agreement information


5. collects all available infrastructure performance metrics (web server, application server, database server and operating systems for each) and compares them to the EUM data using behavior and regression analysis



Problem Isolation screen show performance correlation between end user response and SQL Server database locks


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


6. determines and displays the most probable suspect CI and alternates


7. displays run books available for all infrastructure CIs for the PI user to run directly from the tool


8. allows the PI user to attach all the information to a service ticket, either existing or create a new one


Another key differentiator of OMi/TBEC and PI is the target user. There is such a wide variance in how organizations work that it is hard to name the role but let me do a brief description and I think will be able to determine the title in your organization.


There are some folks in the organization whose job is to take a quick look (typically < 10 minutes, in one organization I interviewed < 1 minute) at a situation and determine if they have explicit instructions on what to do via scripts or run books. When they have no instructions for a situation they pass it on to someone who has a bit more experience and does some free form triage.


This person might be able to fix the problem or may have to pass it on to a subject matter expert, for example if they believe it is an MS Exchange problem to an Exchange admin. It is this second person that Problem Isolation is targeted at. This is helping automate her job, reducing what might take tens of minutes to hours and performing it in seconds. If it ends up she can’t solve the problem it automatically provides full documentation of all information collected. That alone might take someone five minutes to write-up.


OMi’s target is the operations bridge console user. Ops Bridge operators tend to be lower skilled and face hundreds if not thousands of events per hour. Jon described how OMi helps them work smarter.


TBEC and Problem Isolation both work to find the root cause of an incident but in different ways. Much like a doctor might use an MRI or CAT scan to diagnose a patient based on what the situation is, TBEC and Problem Isolation are complementary tools each with unique capabilities.


Problem Isolation will not find problems in redundant infrastructure that OMi will. Conversely, OMi can’t help with EUM problems when no events are triggered, where Problem Isolation will.


We know this can be a confusing area. We welcome your questions to help us do a better job of describing the difference. But these two are definitely friendly.


For Business Availability Center, Michael Procopio


Get the latest updates on our Twitter feed @HPITOps http://twitter.com/HPITOps


Join the HP Software group on LinkedIn and/or the Business Availability Center group on LinkedIn.


Related Items



  1. Advanced analytics reduces downtime costs - detection

  2. Advanced analytics reduces downtime costs – isolation

  3. Problem Isolation page

  4. Operations Manager i page

Freddy Kruger, James Bond and IT Cost Optimization

by Michael Procopio


Top 10 Ten ways to improve IT Cost Optimization. Another fun video from Mark Leake, this time with an appearance from Freddy and James.


 












Get the latest updates on our Twitter feed @HPITOps http://twitter.com/HPITOps


Join the HP Software LinkedIn Group


For the Business Availability Center, Michael Procopio

Announcing a New BSM Solution Offering for Virtualization

by Michael Procopio


The new offerings include enhancements to HP
Server Automation
, HP
Client Automation
, HP
Storage Essentials
, HP
Network Automation
, and HP Operations
Manager
software.


According to a recent report from
Gartner(1), "Virtualization’s impact on the overall IT industry has
been dramatic, and virtualization will continue to be the leading catalyst for
infrastructure and operations software change through 2013. Organizations are
looking at ways to cut costs, better utilize assets, and reduce implementation
and management time and complexity."


Although virtualization is often adopted to help reduce capital expenditures,
it can trigger increased management expenses and lead to more pronounced
organizational silos. The new HP offerings bridge all the physical and virtual
data center silos through management and automation. This reduces complexity and
ultimately management costs.


"HP business service automation software helps us eliminate manual,
error-prone tasks by automating server lifecycle management, including
provisioning multiple operating systems, software installation, deployment of
patches, configuration management and audits," said Ron Cotten, senior manager
IT OSS Engineering, Level 3 Communications, a leading international provider of
voice, video, and data communications services. "With HP Server Automation, we
are able to patch over 1800 servers in 24 hours, which helps us reduce scheduled
downtime."


The updated HP business service offerings help you:


 


· Increase administrator effectiveness with HP
Operations Manager for virtualization
by monitoring the availability and
performance of all virtual and physical assets through a common dashboard.


· Reduce the risk of downtime with HP Network Automation, which for the
first time gives the network administrator control of the VMware vSwitch in
addition to the physical network environments.


· Provision the right amount of storage to keep applications performing
properly without overspending on excess storage with HP
Server Automation
, the first solution in the industry that gives server
administrators this capability.


· Reduce problem resolution times with HP
Storage Essentials
Performance Edition by quickly identifying,
troubleshooting and reporting performance metric related trends in physical and
virtual environments.


 


“To make virtualization cost effective, customers must minimize operating
expenses and have seamless management of infrastructure silos,” said Erik
Frieberg, vice president of Product Marketing, Software & Solutions, HP.
“Our newly enhanced HP business service offerings help customers manage all
aspects of the physical and virtual application infrastructure to unlock the
true promise of virtualization.”


HP Software Professional Services provides solution consulting services to
accelerate the value of business service automation and business service
management software investments.


HP
Server Automation
, HP
Client Automation
, HP
Storage Essentials
and HP
Network Automation
are available now. HP Operations Manager Virtualization Smart
Plug-In
will be available next month.


 


 

HP Business Availability Center 8.02 What's New

 by Michael Procopio


 BAC 8.02 is now generally available. Here are the highlights of what's new. There are also a number of defect fixes in this release.


 



  • Netuitive integration:

  • Enables integrating Netuitive alarms into Dashboard

  • System Availability Management (SAM) enhancement:

  • SAM administration now displays SAM points in use, enabling more effective management of SiteScope license points by increasing visibility into point consumption

  • Apache Web server upgrade:

  • Upgrade of Apache Web server to version 2.2.11 keeps Business Availability Center current with the latest industry release and compliant with security requirements

  • End User Management (EUM) enhancements, including:

  • Real User Monitor (RUM): Additional OS support for RUM probe (Windows 2003 and RHE5 64 bit); Improved SSL traffic handling for special environments; Seven protocol decoder packs for slow requests: MSSQL, LDAP, MySQL, IMAP, POP3, SMTP, FTP; Improved system health; Keystore management improvements

  • Business Process Monitor (BPM): Support for VuGen 9.5; BPM support for Windows Vista; New MSI installation replaces InstallShield on Windows platforms; New Solaris packaging (SPARC) installation replaces InstallShield on Solaris platforms

  • Business Process Insight enhancement:

  • Implemented a way to link sub-processes to parent processes.

  • Interactive integration documentation for Business Availability Center-Service Manager/Service Center integration:

  • New interactive document that enables selecting specific integration parameters and viewing only the documentation relevant for the integration specified


 


For the Business Availability Center, Michael Procopio


 


Related items:



 


 

Business and IT closer but still not on the same page

by Michael Procopio


Network World editor Denise Dubie assessed a report by the analyst firm Aberdeen Group  in her recent article Application performance management: Keeping an eye on the end-user prize.  Her comments mirrored many of those I have spoken with recently who have said their top priorities this are year are revenue and removing any distractions from making revenue.


What was pleasant to see was data showing the end user performance is still important. More frustrating to see was that business and IT managers still differ in their priority of what needs to be measured, according to the article. As you might guess, business folks are more concerned with business processes while IT folks are more concerned with the infrastructure. One-step down from that the article covers the specifics of how each group prioritized how to do application performance monitoring.


Both end user and infrastructure monitoring are critical. Recently, at HP Software Universe in a talk I gave with a customer he showed this picture.



 


 


This does a good job of making the point that end user monitoring is critical. Since there are multiple pieces to the IT part of the puzzle, cumulative effect is important.


This customer said when he took his job there was a Severity 1 (highest priority) problem meeting everyday with typically greater than 10 "Sev 1" items. Today he has no meetings and approximately one Sev 1 per week.


How did he get here, monitoring the infrastructure. He said when they tracked down the source of the problem they put in a new infrastructure monitor for the item that failed, so he got early warning. But even in his current state he commented that end user monitoring is important because things change, whether it is a new version of the application or a change in the infrastructure that create a situation where something can go wrong that isn't currently being monitored.


For the Business Availability Center, Michael Procopio


 


Related Items:



 



 


 


HP Software Universe - Mainstage Robin Purohit

After a break Mainstage split into a
Business Intelligence session and a Business Technology Optimization (BTO)
session, I went to the later hosted by
Robin
Purohit, vice president and general manger, Software Products, HP Software &
Solutions



Here are some bits I found
interesting:



  1. There are 15M virtual servers now and
    it is expected to double in 2 years.


  2. Three key areas of change IT will see
    are: virtualization, SaaS and Web 2.0.


  3. Web 2.0 screws up a lot in management,
    HP is building Web 2.0 compatibility into BTO tools.


  4. Dataprotector, monitoring tools and
    mapping tools are including or working to include virtualization capability.


  5. Service Manager and Asset Manager are
    now available as SaaS.


  6. 35% of flash apps violate Adobe best
    practices. HP released a testing tool which you can download for free called
    SWFScan. The same
    technology is built into some of HP’s BTO products. Customers can also do a free
    trial of our scanning SaaS.


  7. One customer cut $5M  in costs just in
    automating incidents with HP Operations Orchestration.


  8. HP Software recently announced a suite
    of software for operations of Blackberry implementations. See HP and RIM Announce Strategic Alliance to Mobilize Business on
    BlackBerry
     for more details.


  9. HP Software is publishing
    configuration management best practices later this month.


  10. Brian Byun VP Global Alliances from VMware came on stage
    and announced announced an expanded partnership with HP to jointly develop
    software to manage VMware hypervisor technology. Denise Dubie at Network World
    wrote HP, VMware team to manage virtual
    servers
    .


There are a variety of Twitter accounts
you can follow as well as the hashtag #HPSU09. Search Twitter for
#HPSU09
.


HPITOps  – Covers BSM, ITFM, ITSM, Operations and
Network Management


HPSU09  – show logistics and other
information


HPSoftwareCTO


informationCTO


HPSoftware


BTOCMO – HP BTO Chief Marketing Officer


 


For HP BSM, Michael Procopio

HP Software Universe – Mainstage Andy Isherwood


Andy Isherwood VP, Support & Services
kicked off Mainstage.


There are four key areas shown in the picture above. HP announced this week its  IT Financial Management offering. Andy likened ITFM to an ERP system for IT. Information Management magazine wrote an article on HP ITFM.


HP has had offerings in IT Performance Analytics and IT Resource Optimization for awhile. HP Cloud Assure was announced was announced in May 2009, HP Unveils “Cloud Assure” to Drive Business Adoption of Cloud Services


Some key points from his opening remarks:



  1. Prepare for coming out of the
    recession when cutting costs and innovating.


  2. Best in class means being good at all
    four - aligning to the business, taking out costs, increasing efficiency and
    consolidation.


  3. Jetblue, Altec and T-Mobile were the
    winners of the HP Software Award of Excellence.


  4. As an example of the quick ROI
    companies can get, Altec produced 10% application downtime reduction, 20% faster
    response time, 15% increase in customer satisfaction and a 300% improve
    application transaction time in 6 months.


  5. Last year we were HP Software, this
    year HP Software and Solutions. This was the combining HP Software with HP
    Consulting and Integration. The net result increased our delivery options. In
    addition to offering software for in-house use, HP now has EDS, SaaS and
    continues with it Partners


  6. HP SaaS business is seven years old
    this year and has 650 customers.


You can read other coverage of HP Software Universe in the ITOpsBlog. There are a variety of Twitter accounts
you can follow:


HPITOps  – Covers BSM, ITFM, ITSM, Operations and
Network Management


HPSU09  – show logistics and other
information


HPSoftwareCTO


informationCTO


HPSoftware


BTOCMO – HP BTO Chief Marketing Officer


as well as the Twitter hashtag #HPSU09


For HP BSM, Michael Procopio


 

HP Software Universe - day 1

by Michael Procopio


 


Today was the first day of Software Universe. I had customer meetings all day today. Here are some interesting items from my conversations.



  1. Most said budgets were down in 2009 and will be flat to down in 2010. But a few who were related to government stimulus said theirs will be up.

  2. Co-sourcing and outsourcing continue as ways to reduce costs

  3. A few were focusing on asset management with the express purpose of getting rid of things in the environment they don’t need anymore. They know they are out there but they need to find them first.

  4. Most customers I spoke to said they keep aggregated performance data for 2 years the range was 18 months to 5 years.

  5. There was an interesting discussion about the definition of a business service versus an IT service. The point being made was a business service by definition involves more than IT. While I agree this is a good point, I think the IT industry has focused on business service as a way to say - “I’m thinking about this IT service in the context the business thinks about it not just from my own IT based perspective”

  6. A number of customers have or are about to implement NNMi. If this is something you are interested in check out the NNMi Portal

  7. Many customers are moving to virtualized environment highest percentage I heard was 70%. Another customer forces all internal developers to deliver software as a virtual image.

  8. Another topic was how to monitor out tasked items. For example, some part of what you offer is delivered by a third party - how do you make sure they are living up to your standards. Two methods I heard were 1/ use HP Business Process Monitor 2/ get the 3rd party to send you alerts from their monitoring system.

  9. On the question does your manager of managers send back data to sync the original tools 1 did, 1 didn’t. For the one who did it was part of a closed loop process.

    • Monitor tool finds problem send alert to MOM (Manager of managers).

    • MOM send event ID to monitoring tool

    • Subject matter expert uses monitoring tools to diagnose problem

    • Once diagnosed updates monitoring tool which updates MOM




A very productive day for me. I hope some of this is useful information to you.


For additional coverage my blogger buddy Pete Spielvogel is also here and beat me to the first post. You can read his posts at the ITOps Blog.


There are a variety of Twitter accounts you can follow as well as the hashtag #HPSU09


HPITOps – Covers BSM, Operations and Network Management


HPSU09 – show logistics and other information


HPSoftwareCTO


informationCTO


HPSoftware


BTOCMO – HP BTO Chief Marketing Officer 


 


For HP BSM, Michael Procopio

BSM at HP Software Universe

by Michael Procopio


 


HP Software Universe is next week, 16-18 June, in Las Vegas. Business Service Management (BSM) will be well represented.


In the Business Transaction Management area there are 13 sessions. Most of them are lead by customers. The sessions are listed below.


In the Network Management track Aruna Ravichandran is speaking in three sessions, you can see information on those at her post HPSoftware Universe/HP Technology Forum (HPTF) - Network Management sessions. The rest of the track is listed in the post Network Management at HP Software Universe.


Amy Feldman, Dennis Corning and Peter Spielvogel the ITOps bloggers has covered a number of the sessions in the Consolidated event and performance management. Here are a list of the posts:



 


Business Transaction Management Track













































































































Session ID Title Presenting company
1114 Confessions of a product manager: get the real scoop on the latest HP Business Availability Center HP
1165 The MITRE Corporation: higher operational effectiveness at lower cost through automated alert management MITRE Corporation, AlarmPoint
1233 Key decisions and practical techniques in configuring business transaction management
1236 Real User Management: know how your TCP/IP applications perform for your users HP
1267 Using HP Business Availability Center to analyze and triage application and infrastructure anomalies and problems BCBS of Florida
1303 Sodexo: partnering with HP Software-as-a-Service to ensure critical e-business application performance and availability Sodexo
1342 Wrigley: HP Business Availability Center deployed on Software-as-a-Service yields big improvements in IT monitoring without increasing staff Wrigley
1360 Lockheed Martin: deploying HP Business Availability Center in a virtual environment and forwarding alerts through an iPhone Twitter-based application Lockheed Martin
1363 DIRECTV: an HP Business Availability Center and HP operations implementation DIRECTV
1401 Liberty Life: taking the fast track to implementing HP Business Availability Center and gaining business value in 6 months Liberty Life
1425 Sentara Healthcare: improving the availability of critical business services and fixing IT problems before they impact customers Sentara Healthcare
1436 Lockheed Martin: practical advice for configuring and operating HP End User Management solutions Lockheed Martin
1452 Vale: deploying HP Business Availability Center solutions to monitor applications and systems and to help ensure availability and performance Vale

 You can get the details of all the BSM sessions at the HP Software Universe Track Session Catalog.


I hope to see you there, but if you can’t make it we will be doing follow-up posts. You can also follow on Twitter, the hashtag is #HPSU09. There are already a number of Tweets and the show hasn’t started yet. The Twitter account for the show is HPSU09, if you’d like to follow us. Or visit the HP Software Universe Facebook page.


For the Business Availability Center, Michael Procopio


 

Advanced analytics reduces downtime costs – isolation

by Michael Procopio, Product Manager, BAC 



In the world of advanced analytics, two areas that are of interest to the IT management world are:  detection of a problem and isolation of a problem. Previously I wrote Advanced analytics reduces downtime costs – detection; in this post I’ll cover isolation.


In the previous post, I covered how advanced analytics finds an anomaly, potentially before a threshold is crossed.


Problem Isolation is the process of determining which component in the infrastructure is causing the problem* or incident* that we found. We will presume we are monitoring the service that is having the issue.


If one had no management tools (amazingly I have spoken to customers in this situation) the method of trying to find a problem is to login to each system, router, switch and potentially application (ex: Oracle) look at the items with whatever tools are available (ex: Windows Perfmon)and hopefully you find it. If you are interested in advanced analytics, this is probably not your situation.


The more typical case is you have multiple management tools, network, system, virtualization, database and perhaps others. So if  you know the domain the problem exists in you have a good place to start. I’ve listened to podcasts / read reports which bring up few problems with this: (if you know of any good IT podcasts please send them along)



  • ~80% of problems are sent to the network team with only ~20% being network issues

  • ~60% of problems take >10 experts to resolve

  • ~80% of the time to restore service is spent isolating the problem


Here is an analogy I use with my non IT friends on why this area is needed. You are monitoring the speed of a car going across the country (pick your favorite country). You are separately monitoring the infrastructure, all:



  • roads

  • bridges

  • ferries to take cars across the water


What you don’t know is where the car is (old car, no GPS). You are getting many alerts from the roads, bridges and ferries. Which one is affecting the car? Since you don’t know what road the car is on you don’t know if any given alert is the one affecting your car.


This is where the CDMB comes into the isolation process. The CMDB has the route the car is taking or, in our case, the items in the IT infrastructure that make up the service that has the problem.


Part one of the isolation process is to restrict what we are looking at to the relevant IT items. This greatly reduces the computational power required. For example, one customer I recently visited told me he has 2000+ servers. If we can reduce that to a few app servers and a few database servers (isn’t SOA wonderful for we operations types) that is a factor of ~200 reduction.


Part two of the isolation is the heavy math from HP Labs, with more patent filings.  It is a form of regression analysis, where application or end user response time monitoring is the dependent variable and all the infrastructure metrics are independent variables. In plain terms, if end user response gets worse find the infrastructure metrics that get worse. When end user response gets better find the metrics that get better. The more closely an infrastructure metric tracks the end user response the more likely it is to be the cause.


Again, while the math is interesting, pictures work better for me.


 


The thick grey line is the end user response, the red-purple line is the most closely correlated metric -- in this case a database metric. Just so you don’t have to strain your eyes we provide a table like this (from a different problem) showing the weighted correlations score.


 


Isolation part 3 is to include non-time series data. In the screen capture below you see planned changes and incident details (think alerts) on the timeline. Unplanned changes can also be displayed. Changes are pulled from the CMDB and incidents can come from any management system that can send alerts. And since we know that most problems occur from changes that is an important component. Finally tickets from the helpdesk are included on the timeline, for the case where users are doing the monitoring.


 


All together this automates a number of things the operations teams already do and some math help isolating problems.


 


*Incident and problem are ITIL terms. There may be many incidents that are symptoms of an underlying problem.


 


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Related Items



Since I asked for podcasts here are some I listen too:


Monitoring your cloud computing as easy as calling an airport shuttle

HP made an announcement about new cloud computing management capabilities today: HP Unveils "Cloud Assure" to Drive Business Adoption.


HP currently offers Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) for individual management applications such as HP Business Availability Center (BAC) and HP Service Manager primarily for intranet and extranet applications.




HP Cloud Assure helps customers validate:



  • Security – by scanning networks, operating systems, middleware layers and web applications. It also performs automated penetration testing to identify potential vulnerabilities. This provides customers with an accurate security-risk picture of cloud services to ensure that provider and consumer data are safe from unauthorized access.

  • Performance – by making sure cloud services meet end-user bandwidth and connectivity requirements and provide insight into end-user experiences. This helps validate that service-level agreements are being met and can improve service quality, end-user satisfaction and loyalty with the cloud service.

  • Availability – by monitoring cloud-based applications to isolate potential problems and identify root causes with end-user environments and business processes and to analyze performance issues. This allows for increased visibility, service uptime and performance.




HP Cloud Assure provides control over the three types of cloud service environments:



  • For Infrastructure as a Service, it helps ensure sufficient bandwidth ability and validates appropriate levels of network, operating system and middleware security to prevent intrusion and denial-of-service attacks.

  • For Platform as a Service, it helps ensure customers who build applications using a cloud platform are able to test and verify that they have securely and effectively built applications that can scale and meet the business needs.

  • For Software as a Service, it monitors end-user service levels on the cloud applications, loads tests from a business process perspective and tests for security penetration.




A diagram showing the differences in the services is at Cloud Computing Basics.




In the end it doesn't matter where the service is; you need to be sure it is available and performing to expectations. Cloud Assure provides the capability in a way that is very agile. You say "I need this service monitored" and it is monitored. Its just like calling for an airport shuttle -- you call, they show up.




Related articles:





For Business Availability Center Michael Procopio, product manager HP Problem Isolation.

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About the Author(s)
  • Doug is a subject matter expert for network and system performance management. With an engineering career spanning 25 years at HP, Doug has worked in R&D, support, and technical marketing positions, and is an ambassador for quality and the customer interest.
  • Dan is a subject matter expert for BSM now working in a Technical Product Marketing role. Dan began his career in R&D as a devloper, and team manger. He most recently came from the team that created and delivered engaging technical training to HP pre-sales and Partners on BSM products/solutions. Dan is the co-inventor of 6 patents.
  • This account is for guest bloggers. The blog post will identify the blogger.
  • Manoj Mohanan is a Software Engineer working in the HP OMi Management Packs team. Apart being a developer he also dons the role of an enabler, working with HP Software pre-sales and support teams providing technical assistance with OMi Management Packs. He has experience of more than 8 years in this product line.
  • HP Software BSM Social Media
  • Nimish Shelat is currently focused on Datacenter Automation and IT Process Automation solutions. Shelat strives to help customers, traditional IT and Cloud based IT, transform to Service Centric model. The scope of these solutions spans across server, database and middleware infrastructure. The solutions are optimized for tasks like provisioning, patching, compliance, remediation and processes like Self-healing Incidence Remediation and Rapid Service Fulfilment, Change Management and Disaster Recovery. Shelat has 21 years of experience in IT, 18 of these have been at HP spanning across networking, printing , storage and enterprise software businesses. Prior to his current role as a World-Wide Product Marketing Manager, Shelat has held positions as Software Sales Specialist, Product Manager, Business Strategist, Project Manager and Programmer Analyst. Shelat has a B.S in Computer Science. He has earned his MBA from University of California, Davis with a focus on Marketing and Finance.
  • Architect and User Experience expert with more than 10 years of experience in designing complex applications for all platforms. Currently in Operations Analytics - Big data and Analytics for IT organisations. Follow me on twitter @nuritps
  • 36-year HP employee that writes technical information for HP Software Customers.
  • Pranesh Ramachandran is a Software Engineer working in HP Software’s System Management & Virtualization Monitoring products’ team. He has experience of more than 7 years in this product line.
  • Ramkumar Devanathan (twitter: @rdevanathan) works in the IOM-Customer Assist Team (CAT) providing technical assistance to HP Software pre-sales and support teams with Operations Management products including vPV, SHO, VISPI. He has experience of more than 12 years in this product line, working in various roles ranging from developer to product architect.
  • Ron Koren is a subject matter expert for BSM / APM, currently in the Demo Solutions Group acting as a Senior Architect. Ron has over fourteen years of technology experience, and a proven track record in providing exceptional customer service. Ron began his career in R&D as a software engineer, and later as a team manager. Ron joined HP software in 2007 as an engineer in the Customer-Oriented R&D team. Prior to joining HP, Ron held a leadership development role at Israel’s largest bank. Ron holds a B.S. in Computer Science from The Interdisciplinary Center, Herzliya Israel.
  • Stefan Bergstein is chief architect for HP’s Operations Management & Systems Monitoring products, which are part HP’s business service management solution. His special research interests include virtualization, cloud and software as a service.
  • With 11 plus years of very broad experience as a deployment expert for all the NMC products, my deliverables includes helping the Sales and Pre-Sales team in sizing and architecting the solution and hardware, assisting the implementers in product deployment and helping the customers directly when the products are deployed in production setup. As part of Customer Assist Team, I participate in a lot of customer facing activities from R&D side and provides best practices of using HP SW NMC products for efficient network management and leverage my rich experience in Network Node Manager and related iSPIs products.
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