Deskpro 2000 5166 bios question (153 Views)
Reply
Occasional Advisor
Steve Gross
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎05-13-2003
Message 1 of 19 (153 Views)
Accepted Solution

Deskpro 2000 5166 bios question

Replaced old drive with a 10gb WD. Downloaded setup/F10 diagnostics and loaded on unpartitioned drive. Ran fdisk and created primary partition and then formatted that partition. Loaded OS Win98FE. When restarted the computer stops and displays at the bottom of the screen in 2 separate boxes "F1 Boot" and "F10 Setup". Will not go to OS without hitting F1. C: is selected as active partition. Otherwise works fine. Am I missing something? Also loaded Rompaq for large disk support but still does not display full disk capacity. Any help is appreciated.
Please use plain text.
Honored Contributor
CA893598
Posts: 1,138
Registered: ‎12-29-2002
Message 2 of 19 (153 Views)

Re: Deskpro 2000 5166 bios question

Are there any messages besides the "F1 Boot" and F10 Setup" boxes? Usually the only time this screen is shown is if the system detects a change in the configuration or POST error in which case it will normally display a message.

You could try reseting the CMOS configuration - there's a jumper alongside the SIMM sockets to do this.
Please use plain text.
Occasional Advisor
Steve Gross
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎05-13-2003
Message 3 of 19 (153 Views)

Re: Deskpro 2000 5166 bios question

Yes there is. It is a 1155-System Board Comm Port Address Assignment Conflict.
Please use plain text.
Honored Contributor
CA893598
Posts: 1,138
Registered: ‎12-29-2002
Message 4 of 19 (153 Views)

Re: Deskpro 2000 5166 bios question

That is what's causing it to stop at the F1/F10 screen. The system is telling you is that there is an address conflict between the com port and some other device - do you have any add-in cards, maybe a modem or another communications adapter?

You could try going into setup and changing the com port address, although I do believe that clearing the CMOS will force the system to automatically reconfigure itself at the next power on.

The system should recognise a 10Gb disk with no problem, once you're using the latest version of the BIOS - I put a WD200 (20gb) in mine last night. How much of the disk capacity does it show?
Please use plain text.
Occasional Advisor
Steve Gross
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎05-13-2003
Message 5 of 19 (153 Views)

Re: Deskpro 2000 5166 bios question

I found the 1155 conflict and solved it, somehow my serial port became disabled in setup. Assigned the port an address and problem is fixed. As far as the disk capacity I am still stumped. Setup shows the updated bios date and setting but still getting a disk capacity of 8.4gb.
Please use plain text.
Honored Contributor
CA893598
Posts: 1,138
Registered: ‎12-29-2002
Message 6 of 19 (153 Views)

Re: Deskpro 2000 5166 bios question

Just a thought - did you upgrade the BIOS before or after you installed the new disk?

You might need to completely re-install that disk to get the full capacity.
Please use plain text.
Honored Contributor
Perignon
Posts: 3,775
Registered: ‎03-11-2003
Message 7 of 19 (153 Views)

Re: Deskpro 2000 5166 bios question

Steve,

True! Some BIOS images are not containing specs for large size Disks. A BIOS update would normally solve such kind of problem.

However, there is a question which was not raised yet. Namely, how many partitions have you set on your new HD? Could also be that only C: is correctly identified, with the DCROM moved to another letter than D: and partitions at E: or F:...Ect are missed.

Should that case occur, the solution might lie with resetting the Disks boot-sequence in the BIOS Config.

Regards.
Alain.
Frustrations surmounted are paving the way to expertise.
Please use plain text.
Occasional Advisor
Steve Gross
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎05-13-2003
Message 8 of 19 (153 Views)

Re: Deskpro 2000 5166 bios question

This is a new drive so I installed the F10/Setup utility on the drive first and then installed the updated Rompaq which enables support for drives larger than 8.4gb. I then used fdisk to make a primary partition. I set this to partition the remaining capacity as primary. Fdisk shows the non dos partition as 4mb and the Primary Dos partition as 8060mb, FAT32, 100%. I keep thinking bios when it is actually the F10 setup utility. No actual bios chip in this particular computer.
Please use plain text.
Honored Contributor
CA893598
Posts: 1,138
Registered: ‎12-29-2002
Message 9 of 19 (153 Views)

Re: Deskpro 2000 5166 bios question

Steve

When you install the Rompaq, it actually copies itself to the BIOS "ROM" (which is some sort of EEPROM or flash memory) on the system board.

Because you created the first partition on the disk BEFORE upgrading the BIOS you probably need to use fdisk to remove ALL the partitions from the disk and then reinstall to get the full disk capacity.
Please use plain text.
Honored Contributor
Perignon
Posts: 3,775
Registered: ‎03-11-2003
Message 10 of 19 (153 Views)

Re: Deskpro 2000 5166 bios question

Steve,

I've often experienced that one partition is the best option starting with a new HD. Questionably, this would help that the whole disk-capacity is recognised by the BIOS more easily. Additional partitions can be further on created with utilities such as "Magic Partion" or "Partition It" for example.

This said the BIOS remains the control-tower for the system. In your case, I mean it must contain a ROM image which allows for the correct identification of large-size disks. So you may be whishing to check that this function is referred to in your ROM update specs at the first hand.

May be I am wrong, but I believe that F10 is the Compaq/HP preferred key for getting into the BIOS settings at start up. Also that this command is exclusively dependent on the BIOS model itself. Conversely, it seems that recent HP BIOS versions are utilising F1.

To summarise this, try to fdisk again with one partition only, then format, install the OS and tell us what happens (don't forget to create or get a boot-disk on a floppy at the first hand).

Alain.
Frustrations surmounted are paving the way to expertise.
Please use plain text.
Occasional Advisor
Steve Gross
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎05-13-2003
Message 11 of 19 (114 Views)

Re: Deskpro 2000 5166 bios question

I am a bit confused now about the Compaq "bios". When I searched for this in the forums I read that F10 setup/diagnostics is loaded on a unpartitioned drive to access bios settings. From what I read with this model and age computer this is the way Compaq allows access to the "bios". I thought I read somewhere in the forums also that this is where the bios resided, was on the hard drive. Logically I thought that after setting that up and installing the Rompaq that it would then prepare the system to fully recognize the hard drive capacity when the primary partition was created with fdisk. Sorry this is getting so long and thank you all for your efforts.
Please use plain text.
Honored Contributor
Perignon
Posts: 3,775
Registered: ‎03-11-2003
Message 12 of 19 (114 Views)

Re: Deskpro 2000 5166 bios question

Steve,

Understand your confusion since old models would require that setup/F10 be put on the disk (can be downloaded from HP/Compaq site), wheras new models had this function integrated into the BIOS.

I am afraid this variety is much specific to the manufacturer.

Alain
Frustrations surmounted are paving the way to expertise.
Please use plain text.
Honored Contributor
CA893598
Posts: 1,138
Registered: ‎12-29-2002
Message 13 of 19 (114 Views)

Re: Deskpro 2000 5166 bios question

Steve,

Compaq has almost always done things differently from the other manufacturers and has also, over the years, changed how they do things. Whilst this can be confusing, it also allows them to be innovative and in many cases to offer features that their competitors don't.

Let me explain the specifics of the Deskpro2000 5166, since that's what you're working with.

This is an old machine, and when it was released Compaq was using a system partition on the disk to store CMOS setup utilities and hardware diagnostics.

Although you may have read elsewhere on this forum that the BIOS resides on the hard disk, that is incorrect.

On a Deskpro2000 5166 the BIOS is stored in flash memory on the system board - look in between the riser card slot and the powersupply connectors for a small square IC. Because this is flash memory, you can upgrade the BIOS by downloading a ROMPaq that copies itself to this chip. When executed the ROMPaq unpacks itself to a bootable floppy that you put in the A drive, power on the system and follow the prompts - I'm mentioning this so that you understand the system doesn't need a hard disk or the CMOS setup utilities & diagnostics to do this BIOS upgrade.

When installing a new disk, larger than 8.4Gb, the correct process would be to upgrade the BIOS using the SP15800 ROMPaq and then to install the new disk and load the CMOS utilities & diagnostics from the SP4711 SoftPaq and finally to install your operating system.

Over the years I have maintained several different models of Deskpro and have successfully installed 20Gb disks in a number of Deskpro2000 5166 systems using the steps outlined above. I've also done this with 5166MMX systems, but of course using different ROMPaq & SoftPaq numbers.
Please use plain text.
Occasional Advisor
Steve Gross
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎05-13-2003
Message 14 of 19 (114 Views)

Re: Deskpro 2000 5166 bios question

The information on the last post really clarified what I needed to know. I will clear the drive and begin anew. Since the Rompaq SP15800 has already been installed it should recognize the larger disk now. So I should be able to run sp4711,load the OS and all should be well. Thank you for you help and patience.
Best regards,
Steve
Please use plain text.
Honored Contributor
CA893598
Posts: 1,138
Registered: ‎12-29-2002
Message 15 of 19 (114 Views)

Re: Deskpro 2000 5166 bios question

You're welcome Steve - if there's anything else we can help with, do let us know
Please use plain text.
Honored Contributor
Steven Hauk_1
Posts: 9,770
Registered: ‎10-20-2002
Message 16 of 19 (114 Views)

Re: Deskpro 2000 5166 bios question

It seems a little strange to me that so often there seems to be a somewhat synonymous usage of CMOS and BIOS. Definitions of each from Webopedia.com (pasted below) would indicate that CMOS is not the settings...It's just a technology for a variety of ROM chip on which the settings can be stored. I can easily see how there would be synonymous usage of CMOS, ROM and flash memory, although they're different...they all serve to hold settings in memory while system is off. Referring to the flash memory as the CMOS seems to serve to ease the transition when simply trying to discuss the memory where the settings are stored, even though the technology changed. But to interchange BIOS and CMOS by referring to the CMOS setup...how does that make sense? The F10 Setup is the user interface, which is stored on disk. The BIOS is the settings themselves. The CMOS or the flash chip stores the BIOS.

CMOS - Abbreviation of complementary metal oxide semiconductor. Pronounced see-moss, CMOS is a widely used type of semiconductor. CMOS semiconductors use both NMOS (negative polarity) and PMOS (positive polarity) circuits. Since only one of the circuit types is on at any given time, CMOS chips require less power than chips using just one type of transistor. This makes them particularly attractive for use in battery-powered devices, such as portable computers. Personal computers also contain a small amount of battery-powered CMOS memory to hold the date, time, and system setup parameters.


BIOS - Pronounced "bye-ose," an acronym for basic input/output system. The BIOS is built-in software that determines what a computer can do without accessing programs from a disk. On PCs, the BIOS contains all the code required to control the keyboard, display screen, disk drives, serial communications, and a number of miscellaneous functions.
The BIOS is typically placed in a ROM chip that comes with the computer (it is often called a ROM BIOS). This ensures that the BIOS will always be available and will not be damaged by disk failures. It also makes it possible for a computer to boot itself. Because RAM is faster than ROM, though, many computer manufacturers design systems so that the BIOS is copied from ROM to RAM each time the computer is booted. This is known as shadowing.

Many modern PCs have a flash BIOS, which means that the BIOS has been recorded on a flash memory chip, which can be updated if necessary.

The PC BIOS is fairly standardized, so all PCs are similar at this level (although there are different BIOS versions). Additional DOS functions are usually added through software modules. This means you can upgrade to a newer version of DOS without changing the BIOS.

PC BIOSes that can handle Plug-and-Play (PnP) devices are known as PnP BIOSes, or PnP-aware BIOSes. These BIOSes are always implemented with flash memory rather than ROM.
Please use plain text.
Honored Contributor
CA893598
Posts: 1,138
Registered: ‎12-29-2002
Message 17 of 19 (114 Views)

Re: Deskpro 2000 5166 bios question

 
Please use plain text.
Honored Contributor
Steven Hauk_1
Posts: 9,770
Registered: ‎10-20-2002
Message 18 of 19 (114 Views)

Re: Deskpro 2000 5166 bios question

I knew I could be outdone when it comes to arguing the history of computers. By the time I first saw a computer, they were already smaller than Mack trucks. I just think using the phrase "CMOS setup" is confusing and incorrect.
Please use plain text.
Honored Contributor
CA893598
Posts: 1,138
Registered: ‎12-29-2002
Message 19 of 19 (114 Views)

Re: Deskpro 2000 5166 bios question

There's nothing wrong with being familiar with computers of "Mack truck vintage" - in fact, those of us who are, probably have a better understanding of the bits, nibbles & bytes.

And yes - I'm proud to acknowledge - I do go back to an era where computers were repaired with an oscilloscope and a soldering iron.

What's important is to stay abreast of development - especially in a fast moving world such as the one we live in.
Please use plain text.
The opinions expressed above are the personal opinions of the authors, not of HP. By using this site, you accept the Terms of Use and Rules of Participation