Yo and the art of Application Lifecycle Management

Yo

 

It was quite difficult to miss the big buzz that accompanied the mobile app Yo as it reached the top of the download charts a few weeks ago. This is almost the simplest application ever, yet it is getting so much attention and traction that it triggered many debates throughout social media.


Yo, Wassup

Many resent the shallow level the human communication has reached; by which almost any conversation can be boiled down to the simplest form of “Yo”. This is reminiscent of the Budweiser “Wassup” commercials and the debates they spawned.

 

The truth of the matter is that humans have always found ways to communicate more efficiently. From structuring language and establishing alphabets to Emoticons. This even includes my friends honking the car horn, signaling me to come right down and join them (The 20th century analog version of Yo).

 

Yo is the reflection of human aspiration for increased efficiency.
Doing the same with less resources (less effort, time, location, etc) is one of the passions of the human race. For this reason instead of spending time texting my spouse that I have landed safely, I’d rather “Yo”.

 

When did one-word communication get so complicated?

 

At this point, Yo represents an extreme form of efficient communication. However it eventually may not be as effective because users will need to deal with multiple Yo’s coming at them at the same time. The mental capacity required to discern one Yo from another is too big for most people. Thus it will no longer be efficient as much effort would be required to manage the multiplicity of Yo. I predict that if Yo is still around a year from now, it must evolve to become also effective—and by that truly efficient.

 

The balance and combination between efficiency and effectiveness is a pivotal element in the art of Application Lifecycle Management. When it comes to requirement management for example, many find it more efficient to stick with plain documents and emails to gather and manage application requirements, serving the immediate need of quick communication. Much like Yo.

 

However as requirements increase in number, and grow in complexity, what seemed to be an efficient form of communication at the beginning becomes a tangled web of unmanaged content. In such cases management ills such as miscommunication, feature-creep and poor root-cause analysis eventually require more resources to deal with them.  “Presto” there goes our efficiency down the drain.

 

Truly simplifying complexity

 

Reduction of effort and other resources can be truly achieved, if a slight effort is made to properly structure the requirements in a way that will support complete traceability and full transparency of the work at hand. This will help practitioners and decision makers become genuinely efficient throughout the entire lifecycle process.

 

Author mode.JPG

 

The new Author mode of HP ALM 12 Web Client – Giving Business Analysts and Product Owners a Document style experience

 

Much of the new and exciting functionality introduced by HP ALM came  to serve the need of increased efficiency without sacrificing effectiveness. The goal was to enable organizations to not only to do things right, but also do the right thing and eventually deliver the products and services their customers and users expect to get.

 

Efficiency is a valid one only if it is scalable to deal with greater volumes and complexity, otherwise you find yourself investing more and achieving less.

 

I invite you to check out the latest of HP ALM 12 Web Client by downloading our trial version.

 

Yo Truly,

Ofer

 

Comments
software development | ‎07-14-2014 05:39 AM

Very inspiring article for us Thanks for the great article. ….  It’s definitely a good idea for me and my friends to learn the things that’ll expand their skill set Your ideas and presentation is very  effactive and useful for all. I am loving all of the in turn you are  sharing with each one!… Being a user i really like your visible information  on this page

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About the Author
Backed up with over 20 years of IT experience ranging from Application Development, QA, Product Management and Product Marketing, Ofer Spieg...
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